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Virtual realities: how remote dwelling populations become more remote over time despite technological improvements

Carson, Dean B. and Cleary, Jen (2010). Virtual realities: how remote dwelling populations become more remote over time despite technological improvements. Sustainability,2(5):1282-1296.

Document type: Journal Article
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Title Virtual realities: how remote dwelling populations become more remote over time despite technological improvements
Author Carson, Dean B.
Cleary, Jen
Journal Name Sustainability
Publication Date 2010
Volume Number 2
Issue Number 5
ISSN 2071-1050   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84867157977
Start Page 1282
End Page 1296
Total Pages 14
Place of Publication Basel, Switzerland
Publisher M D P I AG
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract For those who have access to them, technologies of various sorts play a key role in maintaining connections between small and geographically dispersed settlements and to the wider World. For technologies to work in remote areas, there must be a framework of adaptability which ensures that users can adapt their practices to suit the new technology, technologies can be customised for local conditions, and an institutional infrastructure (including a regulatory environment) allows these adaptations to occur. In recent times, remote Australia’s “power to persuade” government to consider its needs when designing regulatory environments has diminished as a result of the changing nature of remote economies. This paper uses two case examples—that of air transport technology and that of communications technology—to demonstrate how a poor regulatory environment in effect increases the isolation of remote settlements. In the case of air transport, over regulation has made the cost of adoption and access too high for many remote dwellers. In the case of communications technology, de-regulation has made it difficult for remote dwellers to demand equity of access to infrastructure. We conclude by suggesting that regulatory systems need to be more aware of the unique conditions facing remote populations. Research into the persistently low rates of technology adoption in remote areas needs to be more cognizant of the regulatory adaptability aspect
Keywords technology adoption
regulatory system
remote Australia
air transport regulation
communications technology
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/su2051282   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)


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