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Does irrigation affect leaf phenology in deciduous and evergreen trees of the savannas of northern Australia?

Myers, BA, Williams, R, Fordyce, I, Duff, GA and Eamus, D (1998). Does irrigation affect leaf phenology in deciduous and evergreen trees of the savannas of northern Australia?. Austral Ecology,23(4):329-339.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 44 times in Scopus Article | Citations

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Title Does irrigation affect leaf phenology in deciduous and evergreen trees of the savannas of northern Australia?
Author Myers, BA
Williams, R
Fordyce, I
Duff, GA
Eamus, D
Journal Name Austral Ecology
Publication Date 1998
Volume Number 23
Issue Number 4
ISSN 1442-9985   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-17444423728
Start Page 329
End Page 339
Total Pages 11
Place of Publication Victoria, Australia
Publisher Blackwell Science
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract AbstractSoil moisture was augmented experimentally during two successive dry seasons and the intervening wet season in a humid tropical savanna in Darwin, northern Australia. Leaf phenology was monitored in four common tree species Termmalia ferdinandiana and Planchonia careya (both deciduous species), and Eucalyptus miniata and Eucalyptus tetrodonta (both evergreen species). Irrigation produced consistently significant effects in only T. ferdinandiana. In this species leaf-flush was significantly earlier, canopy decline and leaf-fall were significantly later and the attainment of full canopy was earlier in irrigated compared with non-irrigated trees. Litterfall, and the seasonal patterns of contraction and expansion of stems (a measure of stem water status or storage) were not significantly affected by irrigation in any species. Leaf longevity in the deciduous species was 6–8 months; some eucalypt leaves lived for approximately 1 year, but none lived longer than 18 months. Irrigation had relatively little effect on leaf longevity. While variation in soil moisture is a potentially important cue to both leaf-fall and leaf-flush, stem water status and climatic factors such as vapour pressure deficit may also be important climatic cues to phenological behaviour.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1442-9993.1998.tb00738.x   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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