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Psychosocial Barriers to Female Leadership: Motivational Gravity in Ghana and Tanzania

Akuahmoah-Boateng, Robert, Bolitho, Floyd H., Carr, Stuart C., Chidgey, J. E., O'Reilly, Bridie M., Phillips, Rachel, Purcell, Ian P. and Rugimbana, Robert Obadiah (2003). Psychosocial Barriers to Female Leadership: Motivational Gravity in Ghana and Tanzania. Psychology and Developing Societies,15(2):201-220.

Document type: Journal Article
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Title Psychosocial Barriers to Female Leadership: Motivational Gravity in Ghana and Tanzania
Author Akuahmoah-Boateng, Robert
Bolitho, Floyd H.
Carr, Stuart C.
Chidgey, J. E.
O'Reilly, Bridie M.
Phillips, Rachel
Purcell, Ian P.
Rugimbana, Robert Obadiah
Journal Name Psychology and Developing Societies
Publication Date 2003
Volume Number 15
Issue Number 2
ISSN 0971-3336   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 201
End Page 220
Place of Publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Women continue to be underrepresented in management globally, including the so-called "develop ing" countries, where gender diversity is especially crucial to business development. From Ghana, 120 experienced employees and 83 future managers from Tanzania's University of Dar-es-Salaam, read scenarios depicting male or female achievers, and predicted what proportions of co-workers and bosses would display encouragement, discouragement, or apathy. In Ghana, male respondents predicted encouragement from males towards male and female achievers but discouragement from females towards female achievers, while female respondents predicted more discouragementgenerally. In Tanzania, male respondents also predicted discouragement from females towards female achievers, while female respondents predicted the exact reverse. Such similarities and differences, across culturally diverse contexts in West and East Africa, highlight both global and local barriers to women in development.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/097133360301500206   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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