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Measuring Exposure to Cannabis use and other Substance use in Remote Aboriginal Populations in Northern Australia: Evaluation of A 'Community Epidemiology' Approach using Proxy Respondents

Clough, Alan R., Cairney, Sheree J., d'Abbs, Peter H. N., Parker, Robert, Maruff, Paul, Gray, Dennis and O'Reilly, Bridie M. (2004). Measuring Exposure to Cannabis use and other Substance use in Remote Aboriginal Populations in Northern Australia: Evaluation of A 'Community Epidemiology' Approach using Proxy Respondents. Addiction Research and Theory,12(3):261-274.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 16 times in Scopus Article | Citations

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Title Measuring Exposure to Cannabis use and other Substance use in Remote Aboriginal Populations in Northern Australia: Evaluation of A 'Community Epidemiology' Approach using Proxy Respondents
Author Clough, Alan R.
Cairney, Sheree J.
d'Abbs, Peter H. N.
Parker, Robert
Maruff, Paul
Gray, Dennis
O'Reilly, Bridie M.
Journal Name Addiction Research and Theory
Publication Date 2004
Volume Number 12
Issue Number 3
ISSN 1606-6359   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-2942523140
Start Page 261
End Page 274
Total Pages 14
Place of Publication UK
Publisher Informa Healthcare
Field of Research 1117 - Public Health and Health Services
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract We evaluate a method to describe changing substance use patterns in northern Australia's remote Aboriginal communities (Arnhem Land, Northern Territory). Substance use was assessed in random samples in two communities A (n = 194) and B (n = 176). Five Aboriginal health workers made assessments independently of each other in community A. A different group of three health workers made independent assessments in community B. Sub-samples were opportunistically recruited for interview (community A, n = 77; community B, n = 55). In community C, 10 1 people were interviewed and were also assessed by four local health workers working together. Proportional agreements (kappa-kappa statistic) among health workers for a history of substance use and current use, varied from kappa=0.207 for petrol sniffing (P=0.006) up to kappa=0.749 for cannabis use (P<0.001), all better than would be expected by chance. In communities A and 13, agreement between health workers' consensus and self-reported substance use was weaker (0.103
Keywords Aboriginal
substance use
proxy respondents
consensus classification
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/16066350410001667143   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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