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Group A Streptococci from a Remote Community Have Novel Multilocus Genotypes but Share emm Types and Housekeeping Alleles with Isolates from Worldwide Sources

McGregor, Karen F., Bilek, Nicole, Bennett, Alicia, Kalia, Awdhesh, Beall, Bernard, Carapetis, Jonathan R., Currie, Bart J., Sriprakash, Kadaba S., Spratt, Brian G. and Bessen, Debra E. (2004). Group A Streptococci from a Remote Community Have Novel Multilocus Genotypes but Share emm Types and Housekeeping Alleles with Isolates from Worldwide Sources. Journal of Infectious Diseases,189(4):717-723.

Document type: Journal Article
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Title Group A Streptococci from a Remote Community Have Novel Multilocus Genotypes but Share emm Types and Housekeeping Alleles with Isolates from Worldwide Sources
Author McGregor, Karen F.
Bilek, Nicole
Bennett, Alicia
Kalia, Awdhesh
Beall, Bernard
Carapetis, Jonathan R.
Currie, Bart J.
Sriprakash, Kadaba S.
Spratt, Brian G.
Bessen, Debra E.
Journal Name Journal of Infectious Diseases
Publication Date 2004
Volume Number 189
Issue Number 4
ISSN 0022-1899   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 717
End Page 723
Total Pages 7
Place of Publication US
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Field of Research 1103 - Clinical Sciences
1108 - Medical Microbiology
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Group A streptococci (GAS) cause several human diseases that differentially affect distinct host populations. Genotypes were defined by multilocus sequence typing and emm typing for 137 organisms collected from individuals in a remote aboriginal island community in tropical Australia and compared with <200 isolates obtained from sources elsewhere in the world. The majority of aboriginal-derived isolates shared emm types and housekeeping alleles with GAS isolates recovered from outside Australia, but these emm types and alleles were in novel combinations. There were many examples in which isolates from aboriginal and non-Australian subjects shared the same emm type, but for approximately 50% of emm types, the multilocus genotypes of isolates of the same emm type but from different regions were very different. A single emm type may typically define a single clone within the United States and on the remote island that is the focus of this study, but in many cases, these clones will be different, and this finding has implications for attempts to make global associations between emm types and certain disease manifestations.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/381452   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
Additional Notes 2652 (Journal)
 
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