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Isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei from northern Australia are distinct by multilocus sequence typing, but strain types do not correlate with clinical presentation

Cheng, Allen C., Godoy, Daniel, Mayo, Mark, Gal, Daniel, Spratt, Brian G. and Currie, Bart J. (2004). Isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei from northern Australia are distinct by multilocus sequence typing, but strain types do not correlate with clinical presentation. Journal of Clinical Microbiology,42(12):5477-5483.

Document type: Journal Article
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Title Isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei from northern Australia are distinct by multilocus sequence typing, but strain types do not correlate with clinical presentation
Author Cheng, Allen C.
Godoy, Daniel
Mayo, Mark
Gal, Daniel
Spratt, Brian G.
Currie, Bart J.
Journal Name Journal of Clinical Microbiology
Publication Date 2004
Volume Number 42
Issue Number 12
ISSN 0095-1137   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 5477
End Page 5483
Total Pages 7
Place of Publication Washington, United States
Publisher American Society for Microbiology
Field of Research 0605 - Microbiology
1108 - Medical Microbiology
0707 - Veterinary Sciences
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Melioidosis is the disease caused by the saprophytic organism Burkholderia pseudomallei. Previous studies have suggested some strain tropism and differential virulence. In this study, we defined strains by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of isolates taken from the Top End of Australia's Northern Territory and compared the results with those of other strains typed worldwide. We specifically sought clinical and geographical correlates of strain types. Among 87 Australian isolates, 48 sequence types were defined. None of the sequence types in this study has been found elsewhere in the world. Strains were distributed widely throughout the region, and the different presentations of disease, including neurological and prostatic infection, were associated with many different strains. There was excellent congruence between pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and MLST, and the two typing methods had a similar level of strain discrimination. The work suggests that host and environmental factors may be more important in determining disease presentation than infecting strain type. It is possible that the distinct but diverse strain types found in this study reflect Australia's geographical isolation over many millions of years.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.42.12.5477-5483.2004   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
Additional Notes Copyright by the American Society for Microbiology


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