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Partitioning of respiration between the gills and air-breathing organ in response to aquatic hypoxia and exercise in the Pacific tarpon, Megalops cyprinoides

Seymour, R. S., Christian, Keith A., Bennett, M. B., Baldwin, J., Wells, R. M. G. and Baudinette, R. V. (2004). Partitioning of respiration between the gills and air-breathing organ in response to aquatic hypoxia and exercise in the Pacific tarpon, Megalops cyprinoides. Physiological and Biochemical Zoology,77(5):760-767.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 14 times in Scopus Article | Citations

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Title Partitioning of respiration between the gills and air-breathing organ in response to aquatic hypoxia and exercise in the Pacific tarpon, Megalops cyprinoides
Author Seymour, R. S.
Christian, Keith A.
Bennett, M. B.
Baldwin, J.
Wells, R. M. G.
Baudinette, R. V.
Journal Name Physiological and Biochemical Zoology
Publication Date 2004
Volume Number 77
Issue Number 5
ISSN 1537-5293   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-11144297669
Start Page 760
End Page 767
Total Pages 8
Place of Publication Chicago, IL, United States
Publisher The University of Chicago Press
Field of Research 0608 - Zoology
1116 - Medical Physiology
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract The evolution of air-breathing organs (ABOs) is associated not only with hypoxic environments but also with activity. This investigation examines the effects of hypoxia and exercise on the partitioning of aquatic and aerial oxygen uptake in the Pacific tarpon. The two-species cosmopolitan genus Megalops is unique among teleosts in using swim bladder ABOs in the pelagic marine environment. Small fish (58-620 g) were swum at two sustainable speeds in a circulating flume respirometer in which dissolved oxygen was controlled. For fish swimming at 0.11 m s-1 in normoxia (Po2 = 21 kPa), there was practically no air breathing, and gill oxygen uptake was 1.53 mL kg-0.67 min-1. Air breathing occurred at 0.5 breaths min-1 in hypoxia (8 kPa) at this speed, when the gills and ABOs accounted for 0.71 and 0.57 mL kg-0.67 min-1, respectively. At 0.22 m s-1 in normoxia, breathing occurred at 0.1 breaths min-1, and gill and ABO oxygen uptake were 2.08 and 0.08 mL kg-0.67 min-1, respectively. In hypoxia and 0.22 m s-1, breathing increased to 0.6 breaths min-1, and gill and ABO oxygen uptake were 1.39 and 1.28 mL kg-0.67 min-1, respectively. Aquatic hypoxia was therefore the primary stimulus for air breathing under the limited conditions of this study, but exercise augmented oxygen uptake by the ABOs, particularly in hypoxic water.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/422056   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)


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