Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Exotic grass invasion in the tropical savannas of northern Australia: Ecosystem consequences

Rossiter-Rachor, Natalie A., Setterfield, Samantha A., Douglas, Michael M., Hutley, Lindsay B. and Cook, Garry D. (2004). Exotic grass invasion in the tropical savannas of northern Australia: Ecosystem consequences. In: Sindel, B.M. and Johnson, S.B. 14th Australian Weeds Conference, Wagga Wagga, NSW, 6-9 September 2004.

Document type: Conference Paper
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar

Author Rossiter-Rachor, Natalie A.
Setterfield, Samantha A.
Douglas, Michael M.
Hutley, Lindsay B.
Cook, Garry D.
Title Exotic grass invasion in the tropical savannas of northern Australia: Ecosystem consequences
Conference Name 14th Australian Weeds Conference
Conference Location Wagga Wagga, NSW
Conference Dates 6-9 September 2004
Conference Publication Title Proceedings of the 14th Australian Weeds Conference : Weed Management - balancing people, planet, profit
Editor Sindel, B.M.
Johnson, S.B.
Place of Publication Sydney, NSW
Publisher Weed Society of New South Wales
Publication Year 2004
ISBN 0-9752488-1-2   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 168
End Page 171
Total Pages 4
Field of Research 0502 - Environmental Science and Management
HERDC Category E1 - Conference Publication (DEST)
Abstract Introduced African grasses are invading the tropical savannas of northern Australia and displacing native grasses. Andropogon gayanus Kunth. (Gamba grass) was introduced into the Northern Territory as a pasture species, but has now established outsideof pastoral properties and is considered an environmental weed in the savannas of the Northern Territory. We found that, compared with sites dominated by native grasses, sites invaded by gamba grass had (1) increased fire intensities by more than threetimes; (2) reduced available soil nitrate levels by 70%; (3) trebled grass water use; and (4) more than halved deep drainage of water. Gamba grass therefore has the ability to out-compete native species, and alter catchment hydrology to the detriment of wetlands and streams.
Keyword Andropogon gayanus
Biological invasions
Ecosystem processes
Fire regimes
Invasive species
Nitrogen cycling
Hydrological cycling
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 143 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 12 Sep 2008, 08:35:25 CST by Administrator