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Examining the impact of control over time on the seed bank of Mimosa pigra on Top End, Australia floodplains

Barratt, Jane L., Douglas, Michael M., Paynter, Quentin and Ashley, Mark (2004). Examining the impact of control over time on the seed bank of Mimosa pigra on Top End, Australia floodplains. In: Julien, Mic, Flanagan, Grant, Heard, Tim, Hennecke, Bertie, Paynter, Quentin and Wilson, Colin 3rd International Symposium on the Management of Mimosa pigra, Darwin, 23-25 September, 2002.

Document type: Conference Paper
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Author Barratt, Jane L.
Douglas, Michael M.
Paynter, Quentin
Ashley, Mark
Title Examining the impact of control over time on the seed bank of Mimosa pigra on Top End, Australia floodplains
Conference Name 3rd International Symposium on the Management of Mimosa pigra
Conference Location Darwin
Conference Dates 23-25 September, 2002
Conference Publication Title Research and management of Mimosa pigra : papers presented at the 3rd International Symposium on the Management of Mimosa pigra
Editor Julien, Mic
Flanagan, Grant
Heard, Tim
Hennecke, Bertie
Paynter, Quentin
Wilson, Colin
Place of Publication Canberra, ACT, Australia
Publisher CSIRO Entomology
Publication Year 2004
ISBN 0-643-06946-1   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 149
End Page 153
Total Pages 5
Field of Research 0502 - Environmental Science and Management
HERDC Category E1 - Conference Publication (DEST)
Abstract Mimosa, Mimosa pigra, is renowned for abundant seed production, many of which remain in the population as a persistent seed bank. Integrated control programmes were effective in reducing the above-ground cover of mimosa but little is known about its effect on the soil seed bank. The viability of mimosa soil seed banks following integrated control was investigated in 2 floodplains in the Top End of northern Australia, in relation to time, since control and vegetation types were lower (by approximately 50%) than under stands of mimosa. This reduction occurred within the first year of control. There were a few consistent differences in the density of mimosa seed banks between vegetation types. The results also indicated considerably lower seed counts under mimosa compared to previous studies, which may be attributed to the effectiveness of current biological control programmes. Integrated control therefore appears to be reducing viable mimosa seeds. Nevertheless, significant numbers of seeds remain in the seed bank, highlighting the importance of follow-up control and sound land-management practices for competitive species to suppress mimosa re-establishment.
 
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Created: Fri, 12 Sep 2008, 08:35:25 CST by Administrator