Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

The Territory is the Map: Designing Navigational Aids

Bidwell, Nicola J., Lueg, Christopher and Axup, Jeff (2005). The Territory is the Map: Designing Navigational Aids. In: Plimmer, Beryl and Amor, Robert 6th International Conference NZ chapter of the ACM's Special Interest Group on Computer-Human Interaction (SIGCHI-NZ), Auckland, New Zealand, 7-9 July 2005.

Document type: Conference Paper
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar

Author Bidwell, Nicola J.
Lueg, Christopher
Axup, Jeff
Title The Territory is the Map: Designing Navigational Aids
Conference Name 6th International Conference NZ chapter of the ACM's Special Interest Group on Computer-Human Interaction (SIGCHI-NZ)
Conference Location Auckland, New Zealand
Conference Dates 7-9 July 2005
Conference Publication Title Proceedings of the 6th ACM SIGCHI New Zealand chapter's international conference on Computer-human interaction: making CHI natural
Editor Plimmer, Beryl
Amor, Robert
Place of Publication New York, NY, USA
Publisher ACM Press
Publication Year 2005
Volume Number 94
ISBN 1-59593-036-1   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 91
End Page 100
Total Pages 10
HERDC Category E1 - Conference Publication (DEST)
Abstract It has been shown that people encounter difficulties in using representations and devices designed to assist navigating unfamiliar terrain. Literature review and self-reported visual and textual data from field experiments are presented. This suggests usability may be limited by assumptions about landmarks implicit in designing representations. Firstly, memorable landmarks are emphasized but route following in situ requires recognizable landmarks. Secondly, little emphasis is placed on differences between landmarks contributing to higher-level concepts related to wayfinding and those directly provoking actions in the environment. Studies analyse landmarks in SMS during collaborative wayfinding to an unfamiliar rendezvous and in images to communicate routes in unfamiliar terrain. Findings illustrate usability benefits for navigation aids.This includes helping users to align a landmark’s illustration to their individual perspective in the environment. It also includes identifying landmark salience for shared use by people navigating in dispersed groups to dynamically-negotiated rendezvous.
Description for Link Link to conference paper
URL http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1073959&CFID=796407513&CFTOKEN=81155250
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 37 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 12 Sep 2008, 08:35:25 CST by Administrator