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The estimation of carbon budgets of frequently burnt tree stands in savannas of northern Australia, using allometric analysis and isotopic discrimination

Cook, Garry D., Liedloff, Adam C., Eager, R. W., Chen, Xiaoyong, Williams, R. J., O'Grady, Anthony P. and Hutley, Lindsay B. (2005). The estimation of carbon budgets of frequently burnt tree stands in savannas of northern Australia, using allometric analysis and isotopic discrimination. Australian Journal of Botany,53(7):621-630.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 33 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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IRMA ID 72965231xPUB10
Title The estimation of carbon budgets of frequently burnt tree stands in savannas of northern Australia, using allometric analysis and isotopic discrimination
Author Cook, Garry D.
Liedloff, Adam C.
Eager, R. W.
Chen, Xiaoyong
Williams, R. J.
O'Grady, Anthony P.
Hutley, Lindsay B.
Journal Name Australian Journal of Botany
Publication Date 2005
Volume Number 53
Issue Number 7
ISSN 0067-1924   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-28644444252
Start Page 621
End Page 630
Total Pages 10
Place of Publication Melbourne, Victoria
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Field of Research 0602 - Ecology
0607 - Plant Biology
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract The stock, rates of sequestration and allocation of carbon were estimated for trees in 14 0.1-ha plots at Kapalga in Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory, using new allometric relationships of carbon stock to stem cross-sectional area and measured growth rates of trees. Carbon stocks of trees ranged from 12 to 58 t ha(-1), with sequestration representing similar to 9% of the total stocks. More than half of the sequestered carbon is allocated to leaves and twigs and similar to 20% to wood. Only similar to 25% is retained in the live trees with leaf and twig fall accounting for 80 - 84% of the total transfers to the environment. An alternative method of calculating sequestration rates from consideration of water use and carbon-isotope discrimination data had a close to 1 : 1 match with estimates from allometric relationships. We developed and applied algorithms to predict the impacts of. re on carbon stocks of live trees. This showed that the reduction in live carbon stocks caused by single fires increased with increasing intensity, but the impact was highly dependent on the tree stand structure.
Keywords kakadu national-park
water-use efficiency
tropical savanna
atmospheric co2
rainfall gradient
fire
delta-c-13
patterns
biomass
management
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/BT04150   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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