Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Using agent-based models to aid reef restoration: Enhancing coral cover and topographic complexity through the spatial arrangement of coral transplants

Sleeman, Jai C., Boggs, Guy S., Radford, Ben C. and Kendrick, Gary A. (2005). Using agent-based models to aid reef restoration: Enhancing coral cover and topographic complexity through the spatial arrangement of coral transplants. Restoration Ecology,13(4):685-694.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 14 times in Scopus Article | Citations

Google Scholar Search Google Scholar

IRMA ID 75034168xPUB19
Title Using agent-based models to aid reef restoration: Enhancing coral cover and topographic complexity through the spatial arrangement of coral transplants
Author Sleeman, Jai C.
Boggs, Guy S.
Radford, Ben C.
Kendrick, Gary A.
Journal Name Restoration Ecology
Publication Date 2005
Volume Number 13
Issue Number 4
ISSN 1526-100X   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-33747034177
Start Page 685
End Page 694
Total Pages 10
Place of Publication Hoboken, New Jersey
Publisher Blackwell Publishing on behalf of the Society for Ecological Restoration International
Field of Research 0501 - Ecological Applications
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract High coral cover and topographic complexity are favorable qualities of a healthy coral reef. Because coral reef restoration is expensive and coral growth is naturally slow, there is a need to strategically arrange coral transplants to maximize coral cover and topographic complexity. Similarly, it is important to understand how differences in the life history characteristics of coral transplants can influence changes in the structural attributes of coral reefs. This study utilizes agent-based computer modeling to explore the different spatial scenarios of coral transplantation using corals with contrasting r- and K-selected life histories. Spatial indexes are used to compare coral cover and topographic complexity at incremental time scales, within which disturbance events are of minor importance in spatial structuring. The outcomes of the model suggest that even-spaced grided transplanting arrangements provide the fastest increase in coral cover and three-dimensional habitat space (topographic complexity) across large temporal scales (< 30 years) for corals with r-selected life history strategies.
Keywords life history strategies
reef modeling
topographic complexity
biscayne national-park
artificial reefs
growth
recruitment
strategies
rehabilitation
communities
australia
fragments
survival
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1526-100X.2005.00087.x   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 46 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 12 Sep 2008, 08:35:25 CST by Administrator