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Integrated pest management in mango orchards in the Northern Territory Australia, using the weaver ant, Oecophylla smaragdina, (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) as a key element

Peng, Renkang K. and Christian, Keith A. (2005). Integrated pest management in mango orchards in the Northern Territory Australia, using the weaver ant, Oecophylla smaragdina, (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) as a key element. International Journal of Pest Management,51(2):149-155.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 31 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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IRMA ID 81151512xPUB17
Title Integrated pest management in mango orchards in the Northern Territory Australia, using the weaver ant, Oecophylla smaragdina, (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) as a key element
Author Peng, Renkang K.
Christian, Keith A.
Journal Name International Journal of Pest Management
Publication Date 2005
Volume Number 51
Issue Number 2
ISSN 0967-0874   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-22144488844
Start Page 149
End Page 155
Total Pages 7
Place of Publication Abingdon, UK
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Field of Research AGRICULTURAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCES
0706 - Horticultural Production
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Mango is the most important commercial fruit crop in the Northern Territory, Australia. Growers currently rely on insecticides to control insect pests of mango, resulting in environmental and social problems. To reduce dependency on insecticides, a suitable IPM programme is needed. Previous work showed that weaver ants can control the major mango insect pests, but they protect soft scales, damage fruits by their formic acid and annoy operatives during fruit harvest. Further research addressing these constraints showed that certain chemicals can reduce soft scale numbers without seriously affecting weaver ant populations, the isolation of ant colonies reduces fruit damage by formic acid, and water spray reduces the ant activity during harvest. A field experiment with two treatments, weaver ants plus soft chemicals (WPS) and weaver ants plus chemical insecticides (CI), was conducted at Howard Springs in the Northern Territory. In two out of the three years, the yield of first class fruit was 20% higher in WPS than in CI. This was mostly explained by lower insect pest damage, lower incidence of mango scab disease and lower infestation of lenticels in WPS. Trees in WPS produced significantly more fruits than in CI in 2002. Overall, trees in WPS resulted in a profit of A$14.50/tree per year, but trees in CI produced only A$8.38/ tree per year. During harvest, farmers experienced only minor problems with ant disturbance. An IPM model using weaver ants as a key element is discussed with respect to 'organic' production.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09670870500131749   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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