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Inter-species genetic movement may blur the epidemiology of streptococcal diseases in endemic regions

Davies, Mark R., Tran, Thanh N., McMillan, David J., Gardiner, Donald L., Currie, Bart J. and Sriprakash, Kadaba S. (2005). Inter-species genetic movement may blur the epidemiology of streptococcal diseases in endemic regions. Microbes and Infection: a journal on infectious agents and host defenses,7(9-Oct):1128-1138.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID 10139xPUB124
Title Inter-species genetic movement may blur the epidemiology of streptococcal diseases in endemic regions
Author Davies, Mark R.
Tran, Thanh N.
McMillan, David J.
Gardiner, Donald L.
Currie, Bart J.
Sriprakash, Kadaba S.
Journal Name Microbes and Infection: a journal on infectious agents and host defenses
Publication Date 2005
Volume Number 7
Issue Number 9-Oct
ISSN 1286-4579   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 1128
End Page 1138
Total Pages 11
Place of Publication France
Publisher Elsevier
Field of Research 0605 - Microbiology
1107 - Immunology
1108 - Medical Microbiology
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (human group G streptococcus, GGS) is generally regarded as a commensal organism but can cause a spectrum of human diseases very similar to that caused by S. pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS). Lateral acquisition of genes between these two phylogenetic ally closely related species is well documented. However, the extent and mechanisms of lateral acquisitions is not known. We report here genomic subtraction between a pathogenic GGS isolate and a community GGS isolate and analyses of the gene sequences unique to the pathovar. Our results show that cross-species genetic transfers are common between GGS and two closely related human pathogens, GAS and the group B streptococcus. We also demonstrate that mobile genetic elements, such as phages and transposons, play an important role in the ongoing inter-species transfers of genetic traits between extant organisms in the community. Furthermore, lateral gene transfers between GAS and GGS may occur more frequently in geographical regions of high GAS endemicity. These observations may have important implications in understanding the epidemiology of streptococcal diseases in such regions.
Keywords streptococcus dysgalactiae
streptococcus pyogenes
streptococcus agalactiae
horizontal gene transfer
mobile genetic elements
streptococcal phages
group g streptococcus
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.micinf.2005.03.018   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
Additional Notes 2868 (Journal)
 
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