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Assessment of a register-based rheumatic heart disease secondary prevention program in an Australian Aboriginal community

Eissa, S, Lee, R, Binns, P, Garstone, G and McDonald, M (2005). Assessment of a register-based rheumatic heart disease secondary prevention program in an Australian Aboriginal community. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health,29(6):521-525.

Document type: Journal Article
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Title Assessment of a register-based rheumatic heart disease secondary prevention program in an Australian Aboriginal community
Author Eissa, S
Lee, R
Binns, P
Garstone, G
McDonald, M
Journal Name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
Publication Date 2005
Volume Number 29
Issue Number 6
ISSN 1326-0200   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 521
End Page 525
Total Pages 5
Place of Publication Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Field of Research 1117 - Public Health and Health Services
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Objective: To assess specific performance indicators relating to a register-based acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease (ARF/RHD) prevention program in a remote Australian Aboriginal community in order to identify the most appropriate avenues for improvements in delivery of services.

Methods: Information kept on the central ARF/RHD register was compared with an amalgamated dataset from three other sources. The community clinic charts of identified patients were reviewed for information regarding accuracy of diagnosis and the number of doses of benzathine penicillin received in the last year. Specific follow-up arrangements were assessed and compared with practice guidelines.

Results: The central ARF/RHD register contained the names of 58 of the 72 (81%) people identified in the community as eligible for inclusion. Only 42% (22/52) of people receiving antibiotic prophylaxis had received 80% or more of the recommended doses in the previous year; service delivery was significantly better for females than males (p=0.004). Individuals in priority category 1 (most severe disease) were found to be receiving follow-up and investigation according to guidelines. About half the people in categories 2 (moderate disease) and 3 (mild disease) had been inadequately investigated and/or missed out on follow-up appointments.

Conclusions: The ARF/RHD prevention program in this large remote Aboriginal community is struggling to deliver services to a substantial proportion of people who require them. Specific interventions, especially those related to men's health, may be required to correct the problems.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-842X.2005.tb00243.x   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
Additional Notes 3042 (Journal) pdf in electronic files
 
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