Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Community-acquired pneumonia in northern Australia: low mortality in a tropical region using locally-developed treatment guidelines

Elliott, J., Anstey, Nicholas M., Jacups, Susan P., Fisher, Dale A. and Currie, Bart J. (2005). Community-acquired pneumonia in northern Australia: low mortality in a tropical region using locally-developed treatment guidelines. International Journal of Infectious Diseases,9(1):15-20.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts:
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar

IRMA ID 10002xPUB34
Title Community-acquired pneumonia in northern Australia: low mortality in a tropical region using locally-developed treatment guidelines
Author Elliott, J.
Anstey, Nicholas M.
Jacups, Susan P.
Fisher, Dale A.
Currie, Bart J.
Journal Name International Journal of Infectious Diseases
Publication Date 2005
Volume Number 9
Issue Number 1
ISSN 1201-9712   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 15
End Page 20
Total Pages 6
Place of Publication UK
Publisher Elsevier
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Objective: To investigate the epidemiology and outcome of adult community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in tropical Australia. Methods: A prospective study was performed of all adult patients with CAP admitted to the Royal Darwin Hospital, a major hospital in tropical northern Australia. A standard definition of CAP was used and data collected on demographics.. risk factors, history, examination, investigations, treatment and outcome. Locally-developed treatment guidelines were used. Results: One hundred and sixty-seven adults were included in the analysis. Aboriginal people were over-represented, younger and were more likely to have risk factors for CAR The most frequent pathogens isolated were Streptococcus pneumoniae and Burkholderia pseudomallei. 'Atypical pneumonia' organisms were uncommon. Treatment guidelines included penicillin for mild pneumonia but emphasised coverage of Burkholderia pseudomallei in those with risk factors, especially during the monsoon season. The mortality rate from pneumonia was low with three deaths in 167 cases (1.8%). Conclusions: International guidelines for the management of CAP have been based on populations and organisms from temperate regions and may not necessarily be applicable to tropical regions. Guidelines based upon local epidemiology must therefore be developed. This study illustrates how mortality can be minimised using a process of determining local CAP etiology, developing treatment guidelines and auditing patient management.
Keywords aborigine
australia
community-acquired pneumonia
tropical
melioidosis
guidelines
melioidosis
management
diagnosis
etiology
therapy
adults
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2004.09.008   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 69 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 12 Sep 2008, 08:35:25 CST by Administrator