Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Glycosylphosphatidylinositols in malaria pathogenesis and immunity: Potential for therapeutic inhibition and vaccination

Boutlis, Craig, Riley, E., Anstey, Nicholas M. and Desouza, J. (2005). Glycosylphosphatidylinositols in malaria pathogenesis and immunity: Potential for therapeutic inhibition and vaccination. Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology,297:145-185.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts:
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar

IRMA ID 10002xPUB39
Title Glycosylphosphatidylinositols in malaria pathogenesis and immunity: Potential for therapeutic inhibition and vaccination
Author Boutlis, Craig
Riley, E.
Anstey, Nicholas M.
Desouza, J.
Journal Name Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology
Publication Date 2005
Volume Number 297
ISSN 0070-217X   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 145
End Page 185
Total Pages 41
Place of Publication US
Publisher Springer Publishing Company
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs) are found in the outer cell membranes of all eukaryotes. GPIs anchor a diverse range of proteins to the surface of Plasmodium falciparum, but may also exist free of protein attachment. In vitro and in vivo studies have established GPIs as likely candidate toxins in malaria, consistent with the prevailing paradigm that attributes induction of inflammatory cytokines, fever and other pathology to parasite toxins released when schizonts rupture. Although evolutionarily conserved, sufficient structural differences-appear to exist that impart upon plasmodial GPIs the ability to activate second messengers in mammalian cells and elicit immune responses. In populations exposed to P.falciparum, the antibody response to purified GPIs is characterised by a predominance of immunoglobulin (Ig)G over IgM and an increase in the prevalence, level and persistence of responses with increasing age. It remains unclear, however, if these antibodies or other cellular responses to GPIs mediate anti-toxic immunity in humans; anti-toxic immunity may comprise either reduction in the severity of disease or maintenance of the malaria-tolerant state (i.e. persistent asymptomatic parasitaemia). R falciparum GPIs are potentially amenable to specific therapeutic inhibition and vaccination; more needs to be known about their dual roles in malaria pathogenesis and protection for these strategies to succeed.
Keywords tumor-necrosis-factor
nitric-oxide synthase
plasmodium-falciparum malaria
highly endemic area
ascaris-lumbricoides infection
murine cerebral malaria
t-cell recognition
papua-new-guinea
vascular endothelial-cells
african sleeping sickness
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/3-540-29967-X_5   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
Additional Notes 2938 (Journal)
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 61 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 12 Sep 2008, 08:35:25 CST by Administrator