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Understanding stream lag-times - implications for water quality sampling in mining-impacted catchments of Kakadu, NT

Moliere, Dene and Boggs, Guy (2005). Understanding stream lag-times - implications for water quality sampling in mining-impacted catchments of Kakadu, NT. In: 29th Hydrology and Water Resources Symposium, Canberra, 21-23 February 2005.

Document type: Conference Paper
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IRMA ID 75034168xPUB1
Author Moliere, Dene
Boggs, Guy
Title Understanding stream lag-times - implications for water quality sampling in mining-impacted catchments of Kakadu, NT
Conference Name 29th Hydrology and Water Resources Symposium
Conference Location Canberra
Conference Dates 21-23 February 2005
Conference Publication Title Proceedings of the 29th Hydrology and Water Resources Symposium, Engineers Australia
Place of Publication Barton, Australia
Publisher Institution of Engineers Australia
Publication Year 2005
ISBN 858258439   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Total Pages 9
Field of Research 0406 - Physical Geography and Environmental Geoscience
HERDC Category E1 - Conference Publication (DEST)
Abstract The understanding of runoff reponse has important implications for stream monitoring within a catchment. In the Kakadu region, stream monitoring is conducted to assess mining-related impacts. However, stream hydrology is typically not incorporated within the design of the sampling regime. This paper describes a simple model for estimating runoff reponse using digital evaluation data that can be applied within the region. Lag-times were determined for several small catchments within Kakadu National Park using observed rainfall-runoff data collected during high magnitude flood events. Relationships between lag-times and geomorphological catchment characteristics, derived from 10 m digital elevation data, were examined. Runoff reponse was found to be most related to stream length and mean channel slope. Field data showed that suspended sediment (and water quality constituents associated with suspended sediment) moves throught the system in pulses or waves generated by runoff events and that these pulses are relatively brief due to rapid sediment exhaustion. This study demonstrates the importance of applying the fitted lag-time relationship to a sampling regime to assess mining-related impacts on stream water quality parameters associated with suspended sediment.
 
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Created: Fri, 12 Sep 2008, 08:35:25 CST by Administrator