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Dry-season use of space, habitats and shelters by the short-eared rock-wallaby (Petrogale brachyotis) in the monsoon tropics

Telfer, W and Griffiths, AD (2006). Dry-season use of space, habitats and shelters by the short-eared rock-wallaby (Petrogale brachyotis) in the monsoon tropics. Wildlife Research,33(3):207-214.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 8 times in Scopus Article | Citations

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Title Dry-season use of space, habitats and shelters by the short-eared rock-wallaby (Petrogale brachyotis) in the monsoon tropics
Author Telfer, W
Griffiths, AD
Journal Name Wildlife Research
Publication Date 2006
Volume Number 33
Issue Number 3
ISSN 1035-3712   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-33744727660
Start Page 207
End Page 214
Total Pages 8
Place of Publication Vic, Australia
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract It is widely recognised that the use of fixed diurnal shelters by rock-wallabies greatly affects their ecology. However, the details of how shelters and Surrounding habitats are used, and how similar these characteristics are across rock-wallaby species, remain scarcely understood. The dry season home range, and use of habitats and den sites, of the short-eared rock wallaby (Petrogale brachyotis) were examined at Litchfield National Park, Northern Territory, Australia. We radio-tracked 10 individuals on foot to locate diurnal shelters, and with fixed towers to determine their nocturnal positions. P brachyotis used a range of rock piles and outcrops for dens, and showed a strong preference for rocky habitats and adjacent woodland. On average, animals used four dens within outcrops, as well as more exposed resting sites. Individual rock-wallabies sometimes shared dens, but there appeared to be male-male intolerance Of Simultaneous use of dens. Mean home range in the dry season was 18.3 ha, and there was no significant difference in home-range area between sexes. Use of space by P brachyotis was very similar to that reported for another tropical rock-wallaby species, P assimilis, and many behavioural traits were also similar to those found in other species of Petrogale.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/WR05032   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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