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Vegetation fires, particulate air pollution and asthma: A panel study in the Australian monsoon tropics

Johnston, F., Webby, R., Pilotto, L., Bailie, Ross S., Parry, David L. and Halpin, Stephen (2006). Vegetation fires, particulate air pollution and asthma: A panel study in the Australian monsoon tropics. International Journal of Environmental Health Research,16(6):391-404.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 20 times in Scopus Article | Citations

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IRMA ID 10005xPUB67
Title Vegetation fires, particulate air pollution and asthma: A panel study in the Australian monsoon tropics
Author Johnston, F.
Webby, R.
Pilotto, L.
Bailie, Ross S.
Parry, David L.
Halpin, Stephen
Journal Name International Journal of Environmental Health Research
Publication Date 2006
Volume Number 16
Issue Number 6
ISSN 0960-3123   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-33845693970
Start Page 391
End Page 404
Total Pages 14
Place of Publication UK
Publisher Taylor & Francis Ltd
Field of Research 1199 - Other Medical and Health Sciences
0699 - Other Biological Sciences
0599 - Other Environmental Sciences
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract We examined the relationship between particulate matter (PM) >10 and >2.5 microns in diameter (PM10 and PM2.5) generated by vegetation fires and daily health outcomes in 251 adults and children with asthma over a 7-month period. Data were analysed using generalized estimating equations adjusted for potential environmental confounders, autocorrelation, weekends and holidays. PM10 ranged from 2.6 - 43.3 ug m-3and was significantly associated with onset of asthma symptoms, commencing oral steroid medication, the mean daily symptom count and the mean daily dose of reliever medication. Similar results were found for PM2.5. No associations were found with the more severe outcomes of asthma attacks, increased health care attendances or missed school/work days. These results help fill a gap in the evidence about the population health impacts of lower levels of pollution characteristic of deliberate landscape burning to control fuel loads versus the better documented risks of more intense and severely polluting wildfires.
Keywords Asthma
air pollution
particulate matter
vegetation fires
prescribed burning
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09603120601093642   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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