Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Agreement between laboratory results and on-site pathology testing using Bayer DCA2000+ and Cholestech LDX point-of-care methods in remote Australian Aboriginal communities

Shemesh, T, Rowley, KG, Shephard, M, Piers, LS and ODea, K (2006). Agreement between laboratory results and on-site pathology testing using Bayer DCA2000+ and Cholestech LDX point-of-care methods in remote Australian Aboriginal communities. Clinica Chimica Acta,367(1-2):69-76.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 34 times in Scopus Article | Citations

Google Scholar Search Google Scholar

Title Agreement between laboratory results and on-site pathology testing using Bayer DCA2000+ and Cholestech LDX point-of-care methods in remote Australian Aboriginal communities
Author Shemesh, T
Rowley, KG
Shephard, M
Piers, LS
ODea, K
Journal Name Clinica Chimica Acta
Publication Date 2006
Volume Number 367
Issue Number 1-2
ISSN 0009-8981   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-33645815482
Start Page 69
End Page 76
Total Pages 8
Place of Publication Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Background: Indigenous Australians experience high risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. On-site pathology data can help identify those at risk. We sought to evaluate point-of-care (POC) analysers in remote Australian communities. Methods: Results obtained from population screening (n=76-118) on the DCA2000+((R)) and Cholestech LDX(R) analysers were compared to laboratory measures. Results were compared using parametric and non-parametric statistical analyses, including the use of conventional cutoff values for pathology markers. Results: Agreements (95% CI) between the two methods for categorising results according to the selected cut-off values ranged from 88% (77-94%) for HDL-C to 99% (92-100%) for glucose, and Kappa coefficients ranged from 0.668 for total cholesterol to 0.945 for glucose. Differences in median values were not clinically meaningful but were statistically significant (P < 0.05) for urinary albumin (18.8 [inter-quartile range: 7.5-41.7] vs. 18.0 [5.5-43.2] mg/L), creatinine (12.1 [7.9-17.1] vs. 12.4 [8.1-17.0] mmol/L) and albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR; 1.66 [0.70-3.53] vs. 1.27 [0.46-3.03] mg/mmol), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C; 1.05 [0.95-1.25] vs. 1.00 [0.81-1.20] mmol/L), triglycerides (1.65 [1.12-2.19] vs. 1.49 [1.07-2.36] mmol/L) and glucose (5.2 [4.5-6.0] vs. 5.2 [4.7-5.8] mmol/L), respectively, for POC and laboratory methods. Median HbA(1c) (5.6% [5.3-6.0%] vs. 5.5% [5.3-6.1%]) and total cholesterol (4.4 [3.8-5.0] vs. 4.4 [3.8-5.1] mmol/L) did not differ significantly. Bland-Altman analyses showed statistically significant (but not clinically meaningful) variation in the measurement difference across analyte concentration for all measures except ACR and total cholesterol. Conclusion: POC instruments provided a reliable alternative to conventional laboratory methods for screening for chronic disease risk factors in locations remote from urban centres. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Keywords point-of-care testing
aboriginal people
diabetes
risk factor screening
blood-glucose
hba(1c)
albumin
microalbuminuria
population
predictor
disease
niddm
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cca.2005.11.014   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 108 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 12 Sep 2008, 08:35:25 CST by Administrator