Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

A randomised controlled trial of hot water (45� C) immersion versus ice packs for pain relief in bluebottle stings

Loten, Conrad, Stokes, Barrie, Worsley, David, Seymour, Jamie E., Jiang, Simon and Isbister, Geoffrey K. (2006). A randomised controlled trial of hot water (45� C) immersion versus ice packs for pain relief in bluebottle stings. Medical Journal of Australia,184(7):329-333.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your CDU eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Download this reading Isbister_2283.pdf Published version application/pdf 244.28KB 61
Reading the attached file works best in Firefox, Chrome and IE 9 or later.

Title A randomised controlled trial of hot water (45� C) immersion versus ice packs for pain relief in bluebottle stings
Author Loten, Conrad
Stokes, Barrie
Worsley, David
Seymour, Jamie E.
Jiang, Simon
Isbister, Geoffrey K.
Journal Name Medical Journal of Australia
Publication Date 2006
Volume Number 184
Issue Number 7
ISSN 0025-729X   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 329
End Page 333
Total Pages 5
Place of Publication Australia
Publisher Australasian Medical Publishing Company Pty. Ltd.
Field of Research 1117 - Public Health and Health Services
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Objective:
To investigate the effectiveness of hot water immersion for the treatment of Physalia sp. (bluebottle or Portuguese Man-of-War) stings.

Design:
Open-label, randomised comparison trial. Primary analysis was by intention to treat, with secondary analysis of nematocyst-confirmed stings. One halfway interim analysis was planned.

Setting:
Surf lifesaving first aid facilities at two beaches in eastern Australia from 30 December 2003 to 5 March 2005.

Participants:
96 subjects presenting after swimming in the ocean for treatment of an apparent sting by a bluebottle.

Interventions:
Hot water immersion (45°C) of the affected part versus ice pack application.

Main outcome measures:
The primary outcome was a clinically important reduction in pain as measured by the visual analogue scale (VAS). Secondary outcomes were the development of regional or radiating pain, frequency of systemic symptoms, and proportion with pruritus or rash on follow-up.

Results:
49 patients received hot water immersion and 47 received ice packs. The two groups had similar baseline features, except patients treated with hot water had more severe initial pain (VAS [mean ± SD]: 54 ± 22 mm versus 42 ± 22 mm). After 10 minutes, 53% of the hot water group reported less pain versus 32% treated with ice (21%; 95% CI, 1%–39%; P = 0.039). After 20 minutes, 87% of the hot water group reported less pain versus 33% treated with ice (54%; 95% CI, 35%–69%; P = 0.002). The trial was stopped after the halfway interim analysis because hot water immersion was shown to be effective (P = 0.002). Hot water was more effective at 20 minutes in nematocyst-confirmed stings (95% versus 29%; P = 0.002). Radiating pain occurred less with hot water (10% versus 30%; P = 0.039). Systemic effects were uncommon in both groups.

Conclusions:
Immersion in water at 45°C for 20 minutes is an effective and practical treatment for pain from bluebottle stings.
Description for Link Link to published version
URL https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2006/184/7/randomised-controlled-trial-hot-water-45-c-immersion-versus-ice-packs-pain-relief


© copyright

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in CDU eSpace. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact digitisation@cdu.edu.au.

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 79 Abstract Views, 63 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 12 Sep 2008, 08:35:25 CST by Administrator