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Generalised regressions provide good estimates of insect and spider biomass in the monsoonal tropics of Australia

Brady, Christopher J. and Noske, Richard A. (2006). Generalised regressions provide good estimates of insect and spider biomass in the monsoonal tropics of Australia. Australian Journal of Entomology,45(3):187-191.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 10 times in Scopus Article | Citations

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IRMA ID 80270966xPUB38
Title Generalised regressions provide good estimates of insect and spider biomass in the monsoonal tropics of Australia
Author Brady, Christopher J.
Noske, Richard A.
Journal Name Australian Journal of Entomology
Publication Date 2006
Volume Number 45
Issue Number 3
ISSN 1440-6055   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-33845524407
Start Page 187
End Page 191
Total Pages 5
Place of Publication UK
Publisher Blackwell Publishing
Field of Research 0608 - Zoology
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract The estimation of arthropod biomass is often important in studies of terrestrial ecosystem structure and function, including analyses of the relative importance of different arthropod taxa in the diet of insectivorous animals. In order to estimate arthropod biomass in eucalypt woodlands and rehabilitated mine-land in the monsoonal tropics of northern Australia, insect morpho-species (n = 693) and spider morpho-species (n = 100) were collected, sorted, then weighed and measured. Body length-weight regressions were determined for spiders, nine insect orders and all insects combined. There was a significant relationship between body length and weight for all taxonomic groups, with the power model being a better predictor than linear or exponential models for all groups except Diptera (which was best predicted by the linear model). Whilst Schoener (1980) found that the length-weight regression slopes of neotropical insects (all orders combined, as well as several individual orders) differed from those of their temperate North American counterparts, our comparisons between monsoon-tropical and temperate Australian arthropods suggested differences among Dipterans and spiders only. We conclude that generalised regressions provide adequate estimates of arthropod biomass across Australia, providing that the body proportions of the dominant taxa do not vary substantively.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-6055.2006.00533.x   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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