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The demand for Indigenous tourism: Are there really 'disagreements' on how little we know?

Tremblay, Pascal (2006). The demand for Indigenous tourism: Are there really 'disagreements' on how little we know?. In: O'Mahony, G. Barry and Whitelaw, Paul A. CAUTHE 2006. Conference of the Council for Australian University Tourism and Hospitality Education, Melbourne, 6-9 February 2006.

Document type: Conference Paper
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Author Tremblay, Pascal
Title The demand for Indigenous tourism: Are there really 'disagreements' on how little we know?
Conference Name CAUTHE 2006. Conference of the Council for Australian University Tourism and Hospitality Education
Conference Location Melbourne
Conference Dates 6-9 February 2006
Conference Publication Title CAUTHE 2006: "to the city and beyond..." - Proceedings of the 16th Annual CAUTHE Conference
Editor O'Mahony, G. Barry
Whitelaw, Paul A.
Place of Publication Melbourne, VIC
Publisher Victoria University
Publication Year 2006
ISBN 0975058517   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 1642
End Page 1652
Total Pages 11
HERDC Category E1 - Conference Publication (DEST)
Abstract The paper contrasts results from a survey of mainly consultant-based research on the demand for Indigenous/Aboriginal tourism within the claims made by Ryan and Huyton in a series of articles reporting their analysis undertaken in the Northern Territory. It first introduces a number of claims stemming from Ryan and Huyton's joint work on the topic and then argues that in their depiction of pervious industry enquiries, Ryan and Huyton exaggerate the extent to which research previous to theirs implied an important and generalised growth in demand for such cultural experiences or products. It is argued that their results are fairly similar to those emanating from previous empirical research and gathered in a survey of demand research of Indigenous Tourism in Australia, Canada and New Zealand. The paper concludes by suggesting that methodological difficulties linked with a mismatch between conceptual complexity and methodological simplicity make existing survey-based research on this topic inadequate for the sake of assessing the importance and potential of Indigenous cultural experiences as tourism products, branding themes and as development strategies.
Keyword Indigenous
Aboriginal
Demand
Market research
Product development
Survey
 
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Created: Fri, 12 Sep 2008, 08:35:25 CST by Administrator