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Bullying behaviour, empathy and social cognition: Cool manipulators or social misfits?

Szarkowicz, Diane L., White, Jennifer and Tyson, Graham A. (2006). Bullying behaviour, empathy and social cognition: Cool manipulators or social misfits?. In: Katsikitis, Mary Proceedings of the Joint Conference of the APS and NZPsS, Auckland, New Zealand, 26-30 September 2006.

Document type: Conference Paper
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Author Szarkowicz, Diane L.
White, Jennifer
Tyson, Graham A.
Title Bullying behaviour, empathy and social cognition: Cool manipulators or social misfits?
Conference Name Proceedings of the Joint Conference of the APS and NZPsS
Conference Location Auckland, New Zealand
Conference Dates 26-30 September 2006
Conference Publication Title Psychology bridging the Tasman: science culture and practice
Editor Katsikitis, Mary
Place of Publication Melbourne
Publisher The Australian Psychological Society Ltd
Publication Year 2006
ISBN 0-909881-30-8   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 400
End Page 404
Total Pages 5
HERDC Category E1 - Conference Publication (DEST)
Abstract While aggressive behaviour is often characterised by deficits in social information processing, bullying, a subcategory of aggression, is generally engaged in by those who have been found to have a good understanding of how others are thinking and feeling. What is not known is if this understanding is used in the same way by different types of bullies. The current study investigated if relational bullies, those who include social relationship manipulation in their bullying, have higher cognitive empathy and social cognition skills, but lower emotional empathy than other types of bullies and non-bullies. A sample of 187 Australian secondary and tertiary undergraduate students participated in this study. All completed the Little, Johns, Henrich and Hawley (2003) Aggression Questionnaire, the Interpersonal Reactivity Index, and responded to two vignettes. Contrary to previous research no significant difference was found between any of the bullying and non-bullying groups on empathy and social cognition. However, the relationship between aggression and empathy was found to be different for males and females, which may have implications for bullying intervention programs.
 
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Created: Fri, 12 Sep 2008, 08:35:25 CST by Administrator