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Prospects for whale shark conservation in Eastern Indonesia through Bajo traditional ecological knowledge and community-based monitoring

Stacey, Natasha E., Karam, Johanna M., Meekan, Mark G., Pickering, Samuel J. and Ninef, Jotham (2012). Prospects for whale shark conservation in Eastern Indonesia through Bajo traditional ecological knowledge and community-based monitoring. Conservation and Society,10(1):63-75.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID 82057923xPUB204
Title Prospects for whale shark conservation in Eastern Indonesia through Bajo traditional ecological knowledge and community-based monitoring
Author Stacey, Natasha E.
Karam, Johanna M.
Meekan, Mark G.
Pickering, Samuel J.
Ninef, Jotham
Journal Name Conservation and Society
Publication Date 2012
Volume Number 10
Issue Number 1
ISSN 0972-4923   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84856595278
Start Page 63
End Page 75
Total Pages 13
Place of Publication India
Publisher Medknow Publications and Media Pvt. Ltd.
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract The whale shark, Rhincodon typus, is a long-lived migratory species inhabiting tropical and warm-temperate waters worldwide. Seasonal aggregations of whale sharks in shallow coastal waters of many countries have led to the development of ecotourism industries. Whale sharks that aggregate seasonally at Ningaloo Reef in Western Australia have a migration range within Indonesian and Southeast Asian waters. However, very little is known about their behaviour, local migration patterns, or potential threats faced in this region. In this study, we investigated traditional ecological knowledge of whale sharks through interviews with Bajo and other fishers from five settlements in the Timor and Roti Islands in eastern Indonesia. We found that there are culturally driven prohibitions and customary beliefs concerning whale sharks among Bajo fishermen, who commonly sight sharks in the Timor Sea, in southern Indonesian and Timor Leste waters. Sightings are most common during the months of August to December. Interviews also indicate a low level of harvesting of whale sharks in the region. The results demonstrate the potential for combining traditional ecological knowledge and new technology to develop whale shark management strategies, and to determine the predictability of whale shark appearances as one vital factor in assessing the potential for development of small-scale whale shark ecotourism initiatives.
Keywords Whale Shark Conservation
Eastern Indonesia
Bajo Traditional Ecological Knowledge
Community-based Monitoring
Rhincodon typus
ecotourism
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0972-4923.92197   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)


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Created: Mon, 15 Oct 2012, 13:56:02 CST by Teresa Haendel