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Role of evaluation in assessing and developing communication and governance processes in an evidence-based policy development/implementation environment

Falk, Ian H., Guenther, John Ch., Lambert, Tina and Johnstone, Kim (2006). Role of evaluation in assessing and developing communication and governance processes in an evidence-based policy development/implementation environment. In: 2006 AES International Conference, Darwin, 4-7 September 2006.

Document type: Conference Paper
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Author Falk, Ian H.
Guenther, John Ch.
Lambert, Tina
Johnstone, Kim
Title Role of evaluation in assessing and developing communication and governance processes in an evidence-based policy development/implementation environment
Conference Name 2006 AES International Conference
Conference Location Darwin
Conference Dates 4-7 September 2006
Conference Publication Title 2006 AES International Conference
Place of Publication Darwin, NT
Publisher Australasian Evaluation Society
Publication Year 2006
Total Pages 12
HERDC Category E2 - Conference Publication - Full written paper, non refereed proceedings (internal)
Abstract Introduction
This paper draws on processes of an evaluation currently being conducted by Charles Darwin University for the Northern Territory government. The task of the evaluation is to inform policy and strategy in relation to the government’s Domestic and Family Violence Strategies. The evaluation is not designed to assess the outcomes of the Strategies. Rather, it is focussed on the processes of the Strategies. These processes relate to a) governance and communication; b) capacity building; and c) building the evidence base. While the size of the evaluation in terms of numbers of stakeholders within the consultative sample frame may suggest a fairly straight forward task for the evaluators, the Northern Territory context poses its own complexities. 

Finding discursive ways of getting the ideas and importance of ‘soft’ words and ideas heard by ‘hard’ ears has ended up being core business to many of us in the Northern Territory concerned with research, particularly, in achieving through it better outcomes for Indigenous people. In our practical day-to-day work of trying to work with complex communities and government in strumentalities to better meet policy targets, we have found that using words and terms such as ‘building strong relationships’ and ‘trust’—even the word ‘values’ is often heard as ‘ideological’—can be counterproductive to achieving policy gains for those who are most in need of their benefits. In short, we have found considerable benefit and potential in drawing on and utilising social capital as (a) a framework to guide the kinds of structures and processes to enable cooperative and productive social action, and (b) an authentication device that assists objectify otherwise ‘soft’ terms and give them a ‘harder’ spin (e.g.,‘partnerships’). So in the latter sense, we also are using social capital in a particular ideological way, as a tool to achieve ends that we hope will be of benefit to others.
Keyword Learning
Communities of practice and social capital
Description for Link Link to conference proceedings
URL http://www.aes.asn.au/professional-learning/international-conference/previous-conferences/185-2006-darwin.html
 
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Created: Fri, 12 Sep 2008, 08:35:25 CST by Administrator