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Suppression of germination and establishment of native annual rice by introduced para grass on an Australian monsoonal floodplain

Wurm, Penny A.S. (2007). Suppression of germination and establishment of native annual rice by introduced para grass on an Australian monsoonal floodplain. Plant Protection Quarterly,22(3):106-112.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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IRMA ID 80805078xPUB2
Title Suppression of germination and establishment of native annual rice by introduced para grass on an Australian monsoonal floodplain
Author Wurm, Penny A.S.
Journal Name Plant Protection Quarterly
Publication Date 2007
Volume Number 22
Issue Number 3
ISSN 0815-2195   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-35248846975
Start Page 106
End Page 112
Total Pages 7
Place of Publication Australia
Publisher Plant Protection Quarterly
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract The native annual wild rice (Oryza meridionalis) underpins the vertebrate food chain on the monsoonal floodplains of northern Australia. It is being displaced by the exotic perennial para grass (Urochloa mutica). This study reports on a field experiment, where wild rice seed was sown into 1 m2 quadrats of established para grass. Para grass cover was manipulated above the wild rice seed bed, including clipping and herbicide application. The behaviour of wild rice seed under para grass cover in this study was then compared to its behaviour under wild rice cover in a previous study. Oryza meridionalis plants did not establish under para grass treatments, including herbicide treatments that successfully killed para grass. Retrieval of buried bags of wild rice seeds revealed that germination was suppressed. Although 40% of seeds remained viable in the soil for more than 2.5 years, suppressed germination prevented establishment of O. meridionalis populations. Under wild rice cover most seed germinated by this time. High biomass and complex architecture of para grass cover may modify the seedbed, preventing wild rice seeds receiving dormancy-breaking or germination cues. Simply spraying established para grass with herbicide may not allow re-establishment of wild rice. Additional site treatments may be required for re-establishment by O. meridionalis in wetlands managed for biodiversity.
Description for Link Link to published version
URL http://www.weedinfo.com.au/ppq_toc22-3.html


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