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Decreasing incidence of severe malaria and community-acquired bacteraemia among hospitalized children in Muheza, north-eastern Tanzania, 2006-2010

Mtove, George, Amos, Ben, Nadjm, Behzad, Hendriksen, Ilse C. E., Dondorp, Arjen M., Mwambuli, Abraham, Kim, Deok R., Ochiai, R. Leon, Clemens, John D., von Seidlein, Lorenz, Reyburn, Hugh and Deen, Jacqueline L. (2011). Decreasing incidence of severe malaria and community-acquired bacteraemia among hospitalized children in Muheza, north-eastern Tanzania, 2006-2010. Malaria Journal,10(1 - Article No. 320).

Document type: Journal Article
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Title Decreasing incidence of severe malaria and community-acquired bacteraemia among hospitalized children in Muheza, north-eastern Tanzania, 2006-2010
Author Mtove, George
Amos, Ben
Nadjm, Behzad
Hendriksen, Ilse C. E.
Dondorp, Arjen M.
Mwambuli, Abraham
Kim, Deok R.
Ochiai, R. Leon
Clemens, John D.
von Seidlein, Lorenz
Reyburn, Hugh
Deen, Jacqueline L.
Journal Name Malaria Journal
Publication Date 2011
Volume Number 10
Issue Number 1 - Article No. 320
ISSN 1475-2875   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Total Pages 11
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd.
Abstract Background: The annual incidence and temporal trend of severe malaria and community-acquired bacteraemia during a four-year period in Muheza, Tanzania was assessed.

Methods: Data on severely ill febrile children aged 2 months to 14 years from three prospective studies conducted at Muheza District Hospital from 2006 to 2010 was pooled and analysed. On admission, each enrolled child had a thin and thick blood film and at least one rapid diagnostic test for falciparum malaria, as well as a blood culture. The annual incidence of bacteraemia and severe malaria among children coming from Muheza was calculated and their temporal trend was assessed.

Results: Overall, 1, 898 severe falciparum malaria and 684 bacteraemia cases were included. Of these, 1, 356 (71%) and 482 (71%), respectively, were from the referral population of Muheza. The incidence of falciparum malaria and all-cause bacteraemia in Muheza decreased five-fold and three-fold, respectively, from the first to the fourth year of surveillance (p < 0.0001). During this period, the median ages of children from Muheza admitted with severe malaria increased from 1.7 to 2.5 years (p < 0.0001). The reduction in all-cause bacteraemia was mainly driven by the 11-fold decline in the incidence of non-typhoidal salmonellosis. The annual incidences of Haemophilus influenzae and pneumococcal invasive bacterial infections decreased as well but were much fewer in number.

Conclusions: These results add to the growing evidence of the decline in malaria associated with a decrease in non-typhoidal salmonellosis and possibly other bacteraemias. Malarial prevention and control strategies may provide a greater benefit than the mere reduction of malaria alone.
Keywords Bacteraemia
malaria
invasive non-typhoidal salmonellosis
typhoid fever
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-2875-10-320   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)


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