Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Assessment and comparative analysis of a rapid diagnostic test (Tubex�) for the diagnosis of typhoid fever among hospitalized children in rural Tanzania

Ley, Benedikt, Thriemer, Kamala, Ame, Shaali M., Mtove, George M., von Seidlein, Lorenz, Amos, Ben, Hendriksen, Ilse C. E., Mwambuli, Abraham, Shoo, Aikande, Kim, Deok R., Ochiai, Leon R., Favorov, Michael, Clemens, John D., Wilfing, Harald, Deen, Jacqueline L. and Ali, Said M. (2011). Assessment and comparative analysis of a rapid diagnostic test (Tubex�) for the diagnosis of typhoid fever among hospitalized children in rural Tanzania. BMC Infectious Diseases,11(1):147-152.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts:
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your CDU eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Download this reading Ley_25086.pdf Published version application/pdf 242.62KB 52
Reading the attached file works best in Firefox, Chrome and IE 9 or later.

IRMA ID kmckayxPUB34
Title Assessment and comparative analysis of a rapid diagnostic test (Tubex�) for the diagnosis of typhoid fever among hospitalized children in rural Tanzania
Author Ley, Benedikt
Thriemer, Kamala
Ame, Shaali M.
Mtove, George M.
von Seidlein, Lorenz
Amos, Ben
Hendriksen, Ilse C. E.
Mwambuli, Abraham
Shoo, Aikande
Kim, Deok R.
Ochiai, Leon R.
Favorov, Michael
Clemens, John D.
Wilfing, Harald
Deen, Jacqueline L.
Ali, Said M.
Journal Name BMC Infectious Diseases
Publication Date 2011
Volume Number 11
Issue Number 1
ISSN 1471-2334   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 147
End Page 152
Total Pages 6
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd.
Abstract Background: Typhoid fever remains a significant health problem in many developing countries. A rapid test with a performance comparable to that of blood culture would be highly useful. A rapid diagnostic test for typhoid fever, Tubex®, is commercially available that uses particle separation to detect immunoglobulin M directed towards Salmonella Typhi O9 lipopolysaccharide in sera.

Methods: We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of the Tubex test among Tanzanian children hospitalized with febrile illness using blood culture as gold standard. Evaluation was done considering blood culture confirmed S. Typhi with non-typhi salmonella (NTS) and non - salmonella isolates as controls as well as with non-salmonella isolates only.

Results: Of 139 samples tested with Tubex, 33 were positive for S. Typhi in blood culture, 49 were culture-confirmed NTS infections, and 57 were other non-salmonella infections. Thirteen hemolyzed samples were excluded. Using all non - S. Typhi isolates as controls, we showed a sensitivity of 79% and a specificity of 89%. When the analysis was repeated excluding NTS from the pool of controls we showed a sensitivity of 79% and a specificity of 97%. There was no significant difference in the test performance using the two different control groups (p > 0.05).

Conclusion: This first evaluation of the Tubex test in an African setting showed a similar performance to those seen in some Asian settings. Comparison with the earlier results of a Widal test using the same samples showed no significant difference (p > 0.05) for any of the performance indicators, irrespective of the applied control group.
Keywords Salmonella
Tubex®
Widal
Africa
Rapid Diagnostic Test
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2334-11-147   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)


© copyright

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in CDU eSpace. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact digitisation@cdu.edu.au.

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 636 Abstract Views, 53 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 26 Nov 2012, 15:59:08 CST by Teresa Haendel