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Epidemiology of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis in tropical communities, Northern Australia

McDonald, Malcolm, Towers, Rebecca J., Andrews, Ross M., Carapetis, Jonathan R. and Currie, Bart J. (2007). Epidemiology of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis in tropical communities, Northern Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases,13(11):1694-1700.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID 10452xPUB43
Title Epidemiology of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis in tropical communities, Northern Australia
Author McDonald, Malcolm
Towers, Rebecca J.
Andrews, Ross M.
Carapetis, Jonathan R.
Currie, Bart J.
Journal Name Emerging Infectious Diseases
Publication Date 2007
Volume Number 13
Issue Number 11
ISSN 1080-6040   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 1694
End Page 1700
Total Pages 7
Place of Publication Atlanta, United States
Publisher U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (groups C and G streptococci [GCS/GGS]) is an increasingly recognized human pathogen, although it may follow indirect pathways. Prospective surveillance of selected households in 3 remote Aboriginal communities in Australia provided 337 GCS/GGS isolates that were emm sequence-typed. Lancefield group C isolates (GCS) were localized to specific households and group G isolates (GGS) were more evenly distributed. GCS/GGS was more frequently recovered from the throat than group A streptococci (GAS [S. pyogenes]) but rarely recovered from skin sores, and then only with Staphylococcus aureus or GAS. Symptomatic GGS/GGC pharyngitis was also rare. Specific emm sequence types of GCS/GGS did not appear to cycle through the communities (sequential strain replacement) in a manner suggesting acquisition of type-specific immunity. These communities already have high levels of streptococcal and poststreptococcal disease. GCS/GGS may increase in importance as it acquires key virulence factors from GAS by lateral gene transfer.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1311.061258   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)


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