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Molecular typing of Streptococcus pyogenes from remote Aboriginal communities where rheumatic fever is common and pyoderma is the predominant streptococcal infection

McDonald, Malcolm I., Towers, Rebecca J., Fagan, Peter K., Carapetis, Jonathan R. and Currie, Bart J. (2007). Molecular typing of Streptococcus pyogenes from remote Aboriginal communities where rheumatic fever is common and pyoderma is the predominant streptococcal infection. Epidemiology and Infection,135(8):1398-1405.

Document type: Journal Article
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Title Molecular typing of Streptococcus pyogenes from remote Aboriginal communities where rheumatic fever is common and pyoderma is the predominant streptococcal infection
Author McDonald, Malcolm I.
Towers, Rebecca J.
Fagan, Peter K.
Carapetis, Jonathan R.
Currie, Bart J.
Journal Name Epidemiology and Infection
Publication Date 2007
Volume Number 135
Issue Number 8
ISSN 0950-2688   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 1398
End Page 1405
Total Pages 8
Place of Publication Cambridge, U.K
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Field of Research 0605 - Microbiology
0799 - Other Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
1107 - Immunology
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Aboriginal Australians in remote communities have high rates of rheumatic heart disease (RHD); yet pharyngitis is reportedly rare whilst pyoderma is common. Some strains of group A streptococci (GAS) have preference for the throat and others for the skin depending on M protein type. A study in three remote communities provided 350 GAS isolates for emm sequence typing, 244 were also emm pattern typed. There was 100% correlation between emm sequence and pattern type. Patterns D and E (non-throat tropic) made up 71% of throat and 87% of skin isolates although patterns A–C (throat tropic) were more common in the throat than the skin (RR 2·3, 95% CI 1·4–3·8) whilst the opposite was found for pattern D (RR 2·2, 95% CI 1·7–3·0). Pattern E favoured the throat (RR 1·4, 95% CI 1·1–1·8). Where environmental factors predispose to skin infection, emm pattern types D and E prevail, whatever the recovery site.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0950268807008023   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)


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