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The mangrove ant, Camponotus anderseni, switches to anaerobic respiration in response to elevated CO2 levels

Nielsen, M. and Christian, Keith A. (2007). The mangrove ant, Camponotus anderseni, switches to anaerobic respiration in response to elevated CO2 levels. Journal of Insect Physiology,53(5):505-508.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID 80801157xPUB30
Title The mangrove ant, Camponotus anderseni, switches to anaerobic respiration in response to elevated CO2 levels
Author Nielsen, M.
Christian, Keith A.
Journal Name Journal of Insect Physiology
Publication Date 2007
Volume Number 53
Issue Number 5
ISSN 0022-1910   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-34247567915
Start Page 505
End Page 508
Total Pages 4
Place of Publication UK
Publisher Pergamon
Field of Research 0606 - Physiology
0608 - Zoology
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract The small tree-living mangrove ant Camponotus anderseni is remarkably adapted for surviving tidal inundation. By blocking the nest entrance with a soldier's head, water intrusion into the nest cavity can be effectively prevented, but lack of gas-exchange caused extremely high concentrations of CO2( > 30%) and very low O-2 concentrations ( < 1 %). The O-2 uptake in experiments with CO2 absorption showed a linear decrease until about 4%, whereas the O-2 uptake in chambers without absorbent showed a decrease with a different pattern, consisting of three parts. The first component of this decrease is a linear decrease to about 18%, which is the normal O-2 concentration in open natural nests. The second phase is an exponential decrease continuing to about 4% O-2, showing that the CO2 concentrations have influence on the 0, uptake. The final component is also exponential, but with a much smaller slope. The respiratory quotient (RQ) was 0.92 until CO2 concentration increased to about 15-17%, and after that it showed a strong increase, which is due to the initiation of anaerobic respiration. Anaerobic respiration has not been demonstrated for social insects before, but it is not surprising that it is found in this ant species, which lives in the extreme conditions of a hollow twig in an inundated mangrove.
Keywords Camponotus anderseni
anaerobic respiration
respiratory quotient
oxygen concentrations
mangrove
carbon dioxide concentrations
sokolova forel hymenoptera
larval tiger beetle
northern australia
formicidae
metabolism
cicindelidae
populations
inundation
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jinsphys.2007.02.002   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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