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Can changes in malaria transmission intensity explain prolonged protection and contribute to high protective efficacy of intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in infants?

Gosling, Roly D., Ghani, Azra C., Deen, Jacqueline L., von Seidlein, Lorenz, Greenwood, Brian M. and Chandramohan, Daniel (2008). Can changes in malaria transmission intensity explain prolonged protection and contribute to high protective efficacy of intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in infants?. Malaria Journal,7(1 - Article No. 54).

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Title Can changes in malaria transmission intensity explain prolonged protection and contribute to high protective efficacy of intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in infants?
Author Gosling, Roly D.
Ghani, Azra C.
Deen, Jacqueline L.
von Seidlein, Lorenz
Greenwood, Brian M.
Chandramohan, Daniel
Journal Name Malaria Journal
Publication Date 2008
Volume Number 7
Issue Number 1 - Article No. 54
ISSN 14752875   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Total Pages 13
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd.
Abstract Background:  Intermittent preventive  (or presumptive) treatment of infants (IPTi), the administration of a curative anti-malarial dose to infants whether or not they are known to be infected, is being considered as a new strategy for malaria control. Five of the six trials using sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for IPTi showed protective efficacies (PEs) against clinical malaria ranging from 20.1 – 33.3% whilst one, the Ifakara study, showed a protective efficacy of 58.6%.

Materials and methods:  The possible mechanisms that could explain the differences in the reported PE of IPTi were examined by comparing output from a mathematical model to data from the six published IPTi trials.

Results:  Under stable transmission, the PE of IPTi predicted by the model was comparable with the observed PEs in all but the Ifakara study (ratio of the mean predicted PE to that observed was1.02, range 0.39 – 1.59). When a reduction in the incidence of infection during the study was included in the model, the predicted PE of IPTi increased and extended into the second year of life, as observed in the Ifakara study.

Conclusion:  A decrease in malaria transmission during the study period may explain part of the difference in observed PEs of IP Ti between sites and the extended period of protection into the second year of life observed in the Ifakara study. This finding of continued benefit of interventions in settings of decreasing transmission may explain why rebound of clinical malaria was absent in the large scale trials of insecticide-treated bed nets.
Keywords Intermittent preventive (or presumptive) treatment of infants (IPTi)
strategy for malaria control
sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP)
protective efficacies (PEs)
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-2875-7-54   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)


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