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Allometric scaling of lung volume and its consequences for marine turtle diving performance

Hochscheid, S, McMahon, Clive, Bradshaw, Corey, Maffucci, F, Bentivegna, F and Hays, G (2007). Allometric scaling of lung volume and its consequences for marine turtle diving performance. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular and Integrative Physiology,148(2):360-367.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 16 times in Scopus Article | Citations

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IRMA ID 79264438xPUB34
Title Allometric scaling of lung volume and its consequences for marine turtle diving performance
Author Hochscheid, S
McMahon, Clive
Bradshaw, Corey
Maffucci, F
Bentivegna, F
Hays, G
Journal Name Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular and Integrative Physiology
Publication Date 2007
Volume Number 148
Issue Number 2
ISSN 1531-4332   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-34547579036
Start Page 360
End Page 367
Total Pages 8
Place of Publication New York, United States of America
Publisher Elsevier
Field of Research 0606 - Physiology
1116 - Medical Physiology
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Marine turtle lungs have multiple functions including respiration, oxygen storage and buoyancy regulation, so lung size is an important indicator of dive performance. We determined maximum lung volumes (V-L) for 30 individuals from three species (Caretta caretta n = 13; Eretmochelys imbricata n = 12; Natator depressus n = 5) across a range of body masses (M-b): 0.9 to 46 kg. V-L was 114 ml kg(-1) and increased with Mb with a scaling factor of 0.92. Based on these values for VL we demonstrated that diving capacities (assessed via aerobic dive limits) of marine turtles were potentially over-estimated when the V-L-body mass effect was not considered (by 10 to 20% for 5 to 25 kg turtles and by > 20% for turtles >= 25 kg). While aerobic dive limits scale with an exponent of 0.6, an analysis of average dive durations in free-ranging chelonian marine turtles revealed that dive duration increases with a mass exponent of 0.5 1, although there was considerable scatter around the regression line. While this highlights the need to determine more parameters that affect the duration-body mass relationship, our results provide a reference point for calculating oxygen storage capacities and air volumes available for buoyancy control.
Keywords aerobic dive limit
allometry
body mass
dive duration
diving capacity
lung volume
green turtles
chelonia mydas L
sea turtle
caretta
oxygen stores
eretmochelys imbricata
dermochelys coriacea
leatherback turtles
loggerhead turtles
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpa.2007.05.010   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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