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Blood chemistry reference values for two ecologically distinct populations of foraging green turtles, eastern Indian Ocean

Whiting, Scott D., Guinea, Michael L., Limpus, C. and Fomiatti, K. (2007). Blood chemistry reference values for two ecologically distinct populations of foraging green turtles, eastern Indian Ocean. Comparative Clinical Pathology,16(2):109-118.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 15 times in Scopus Article | Citations

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IRMA ID 02468002xPUB12
Title Blood chemistry reference values for two ecologically distinct populations of foraging green turtles, eastern Indian Ocean
Author Whiting, Scott D.
Guinea, Michael L.
Limpus, C.
Fomiatti, K.
Journal Name Comparative Clinical Pathology
Publication Date 2007
Volume Number 16
Issue Number 2
ISSN 1618-5641   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-34047116407
Start Page 109
End Page 118
Total Pages 10
Place of Publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Springer Publishing Company
Field of Research 0502 - Environmental Science and Management
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Abstract Blood chemistry reference values are important to allow the monitoring of the health of individuals and populations. Blood chemistry reference values were obtained from individuals of two ecologically distinct foraging populations of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) in the eastern Indian Ocean. Samples were taken from 51 resident green turtles from Ashmore Reef (a shelf-edge platform reef) with a predominant seagrass diet, and 59 samples were taken from green turtles from Fog Bay, an inshore coastal embayment in the Northern Territory of Australia with a predominant algal diet. Reference values were different between habitats and showed the importance of regional and habitat-specific reference values for green turtles if they are to be used as a diagnostic tool. Green turtles with a diet of seagrass showed higher levels of total protein than turtles of the same size with algal diets. Clinically sick turtles from Fog Bay had significantly higher levels of urea and AST and lower PCV values than healthy turtles from the same population. Newly recruited turtles from Fog Bay also had higher levels of urea and AST compared to other turtles from the same area. Low levels of internal parasites did not affect blood reference values in clinically healthy turtles.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00580-006-0646-y   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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