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Air breathing minimizes post-exercise lactate load in the tropical Pacific tarpon, Megalops cyprinoides Broussonet 1782 but oxygen debt is repaid by aquatic breathing

Wells, R. M. G., Baldwin, J., Seymour, R. S., Christian, Keith A. and Farrell, A. P. (2007). Air breathing minimizes post-exercise lactate load in the tropical Pacific tarpon, Megalops cyprinoides Broussonet 1782 but oxygen debt is repaid by aquatic breathing. Journal of Fish Biology,71(6):1649-1661.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 10 times in Scopus Article | Citations

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IRMA ID 80801157xPUB31
Title Air breathing minimizes post-exercise lactate load in the tropical Pacific tarpon, Megalops cyprinoides Broussonet 1782 but oxygen debt is repaid by aquatic breathing
Author Wells, R. M. G.
Baldwin, J.
Seymour, R. S.
Christian, Keith A.
Farrell, A. P.
Journal Name Journal of Fish Biology
Publication Date 2007
Volume Number 71
Issue Number 6
ISSN 0022-1112   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-36849041126
Start Page 1649
End Page 1661
Total Pages 13
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Field of Research 0608 - Zoology
0704 - Fisheries Sciences
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Swimming in a flume at reduced water pO2 resulted in muscle and blood lactate levels in Pacific tarpon Megalops cyprinoides that were significantly higher when fish did not have access to air. Blood glucose and haematological variables were unchanged throughout the regimes of exercise at two swimming speeds and hypoxia. Strenuous exercise with bouts of burst swimming, however, resulted in both high blood lactate and glucose, and perturbed haematological status with elevated haemoglobin and reduced mean cell-haemoglobin concentration. Post-exercise recovery was achieved through aquatic breathing rather than by air breathing. The air-breathing organ in Pacific tarpon therefore prolonged aerobic activity, but gill breathing was used to repay oxygen debt.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8649.2007.01625.x   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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