Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Anatomy of the nasal passages of three species of Australian bats in relation to water loss

Nelson, J. E., Christian, Keith A. and Baudinette, R. V. (2007). Anatomy of the nasal passages of three species of Australian bats in relation to water loss. Australian Journal of Zoology,55(1):57-62.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus Article | Citations

Google Scholar Search Google Scholar

IRMA ID 80801157xPUB27
Title Anatomy of the nasal passages of three species of Australian bats in relation to water loss
Author Nelson, J. E.
Christian, Keith A.
Baudinette, R. V.
Journal Name Australian Journal of Zoology
Publication Date 2007
Volume Number 55
Issue Number 1
ISSN 0004-959X   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-33947596008
Start Page 57
End Page 62
Total Pages 6
Place of Publication Australia
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Field of Research 0608 - Zoology
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract A previous study found substantial variation in rates of water loss in three species of Australian bats, with the orange leafnosed bat (Rhinonycteris aurantius) having a rate more than twice that of the large bentwing bat (Miniopterus schreibersii) and the ghost bat (Macroderma gigas). Using histological sections, we examined the nasal passages of these species to determine whether any of the species have complex turbinals that may function to reduce respiratory water loss. M. schreibersii has the most complex nasal passages, and R. aurantius has the simplest. Calculations indicate that the respiratory water loss of R. aurantius and M. schreibersii are similar, but this indicates that the nasal turbinals of M. schreibersii function to conserve pulmonary water given that the metabolic rate, and therefore respiratory frequency, is higher in M. schreibersii. R. aurantius and M. gigas echolocate by emitting pulses from the nostrils whereas M. schreibersii emits pulses from the mouth. The structure of the nasal passages of nasal emitters is constrained by the demands of echolocation, and this may preclude the development of complex turbinal arrangements required for the conservation of respiratory water.
Keywords mammalian endothermy
microchiropter
echolocation
chiropter
cavities
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/ZO06101   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 75 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 12 Sep 2008, 08:35:25 CST by Administrator