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Would the Australian megafauna have become extinct if humans had never colonised the continent? Comments on "A review of the evidence for a human role in the extinction of Australian megafauna and an alternative explanation" by S. Wroe and J. Fi

Brook, Barry William, Bowman, David M. J. S., Burney, D. A., Flannery, TF, Gagan, MK, Gillespie, R, Johnson, CN, Kershaw, P, Magee, JW, Martin, PS, Miller, GH, Peiser, B and Roberts, RG (2007). Would the Australian megafauna have become extinct if humans had never colonised the continent? Comments on "A review of the evidence for a human role in the extinction of Australian megafauna and an alternative explanation" by S. Wroe and J. Field. Quaternary Science Reviews,26(3-4):560-564.

Document type: Journal Article
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Title Would the Australian megafauna have become extinct if humans had never colonised the continent? Comments on "A review of the evidence for a human role in the extinction of Australian megafauna and an alternative explanation" by S. Wroe and J. Field
Author Brook, Barry William
Bowman, David M. J. S.
Burney, D. A.
Flannery, TF
Gagan, MK
Gillespie, R
Johnson, CN
Kershaw, P
Magee, JW
Martin, PS
Miller, GH
Peiser, B
Roberts, RG
Journal Name Quaternary Science Reviews
Publication Date 2007
Volume Number 26
Issue Number 3-4
ISSN 0277-3791   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-33847401917
Start Page 560
End Page 564
Total Pages 5
Place of Publication Oxford, UK
Publisher Elsevier
Field of Research EARTH SCIENCES
0403 - Geology
0406 - Physical Geography and Environmental Geoscience
HERDC Category C2 - Journal Article - Other contributions to refereed journal (internal)
Abstract A critical comment on 'A review of the evidence for a human role in the extinction of Australian megafauna and an alternative explanation' by S. Wroe and J. Field is presented. The authors have highlighted a range of ideas under consideration, and provided a selective interpretation which does not come to terms with biology and ignores or misinterprets current evidence. They rely heavily on the ages reported by Roberts et al. (2001) to argue for a gradual attenuation of the megafauna. They propose a staggered series of extinctions throughout the Middle and Late Pleistocene, with many taxa lost during the Penultimate Glacial Maximum (PGM) 140 130 ka, and relatively few species persisting. They ignore measurement uncertainties associated with the ages, which, when properly considered, means that 20, rather than eight of the species they list have last appearance ages consistent with ́45 ka.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2006.10.008   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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