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Movements, dens and feeding behaviour of the tropical scaly-tailed possum (Wyulda squamicaudata)

Runcie, M (1999). Movements, dens and feeding behaviour of the tropical scaly-tailed possum (Wyulda squamicaudata). Wildlife Research,26(3):367-373.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 4 times in Scopus Article | Citations

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ISI LOC 000080158400012
Title Movements, dens and feeding behaviour of the tropical scaly-tailed possum (Wyulda squamicaudata)
Author Runcie, M
Journal Name Wildlife Research
Publication Date 1999
Volume Number 26
Issue Number 3
ISSN 1035-3712   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-0032986534
Start Page 367
End Page 373
Total Pages 7
Place of Publication Collingwood, Victoria
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract I used trapping and radio-telemetry to study a population of scaly-tailed possums (Wyulda squamicaudata) in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. Radio-tracking of five adults over eight days provided detailed information on dens, and on size and shape of the home range, and facilitated nocturnal observations. W. squamicaudata used four different types of rock formations for diurnal dens: rockpiles, sunken rockpiles, large rock slabs and underground rock crevices. Radio-tagged possums of both sexes nested alone, used multiple dens and had overlapping home ranges. Both tagged and untagged possums appeared to be solitary and foraged alone. The average size of the home range was 1.0 ha (range 0.03–2.0 ha). Estimates of density ranged from 2.3 to 4.6 possums per hectare. Scaly-tailed possums fed on leaves of four species of trees (Xanthostemon eucalyptoides, X. paradoxus, Eucalyptus spp., and Planchonia careya) as well as the flowers and seeds of a perennial herb (Trachymere didiscordis). Feeding in trees is aided by the rough scaly tail, which sometimes supports the possum’s full body weight. At this study site W. squamicaudata is sympatric with the rock-haunting possum (Petropseudes dahli), and they may compete for food and den resources.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/WR98015   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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