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Differential effects of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 on remote and indigenous groups, Northern Territory, Australia, 2009

Trauer, James McCracken, Laurie, Karen L., McDonnell, Joseph, Kelso, Anne and Markey, Peter G. (2011). Differential effects of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 on remote and indigenous groups, Northern Territory, Australia, 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases,17(9):1615-1623.

Document type: Journal Article
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Title Differential effects of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 on remote and indigenous groups, Northern Territory, Australia, 2009
Author Trauer, James McCracken
Laurie, Karen L.
McDonnell, Joseph
Kelso, Anne
Markey, Peter G.
Journal Name Emerging Infectious Diseases
Publication Date 2011
Volume Number 17
Issue Number 9
ISSN 1080-6059   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 1615
End Page 1623
Total Pages 9
Place of Publication United States
Publisher U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza spread through the Northern Territory, Australia, during June–August 2009. We performed 2 cross-sectional serologic surveys on specimens from Northern Territory residents, with 445 specimens obtained prepandemic and 1,689 specimens postpandemic. Antibody titers were determined by hemagglutination inhibition against reference virus A/California/7/2009 on serum samples collected opportunistically from outpatients. All specimens had data for patients’ gender, age, and address, with patients’ indigenous status determined for 94.1%. Protective immunity (titer >40) was present in 7.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 5.2%–10.1%) of prepandemic specimens and 19.5% (95% CI 17.6%–21.4%) of postpandemic specimens, giving a population-standardized attack rate of 14.9% (95% CI 11.0%–18.9%). Prepandemic proportion of immune persons was greater with increasing age but did not differ by other demographic characteristics. Postpandemic proportion of immune persons was greater in younger groups and around double in indigenous persons. Postpandemic proportion immune was geographically heterogeneous, particularly among remote-living and indigenous groups.
Keywords influenza
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1709.101196   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)


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