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Attributing "Third World Poverty" in Australia and Malawi: A case of donor bias?

Campbell, Danielle, Carr, Stuart C. and MacLachlan, Malcolm (2001). Attributing "Third World Poverty" in Australia and Malawi: A case of donor bias?. Journal of Applied Social Psychology,31(2):409-430.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 24 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Title Attributing "Third World Poverty" in Australia and Malawi: A case of donor bias?
Author Campbell, Danielle
Carr, Stuart C.
MacLachlan, Malcolm
Journal Name Journal of Applied Social Psychology
Publication Date 2001
Volume Number 31
Issue Number 2
ISSN 0021-9029   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-0035242132
Start Page 409
End Page 430
Total Pages 22
Publisher Blackwell Publishing
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Causal attributions for poverty in the developing world were examined from the perspectives of actors living in a developing country (Malawi) and observers living in a developed country (Australia). Ninety-eight Malawian and 100 Australian weekend shoppers responded to the Causes of Third World Poverty Questionnaire (CTWPQ) and the Just World Scale (JWS), with Australian participants also providing information about their frequency of donating to foreign-aid charities. Consistent with the actor-observer bias, Australians were more Likely than were Malawians to attribute poverty to dispositional characteristics of the poor, rather than to situational factors. Among the Australians, situational attributions were in turn associated with frequency of donation behavior. The finding of a donor bias in this sample has important implications for the social marketing of foreign aid to Western donor publics.
Keywords explanations
attitudes
psychology
beliefs
perceptions
society
poor
 
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Created: Wed, 28 Nov 2007, 14:16:08 CST