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Immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses to Plasmodium falciparum glycosylphosphatidylinositols are short-lived and predominantly of the IgG3 subclass

Boutlis, Craig S., Fagan, P. K., Gowda, D. C., Lagog, M., Mgone, C. S., Bockarie, M. J. and Anstey, Nicholas M. (2003). Immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses to Plasmodium falciparum glycosylphosphatidylinositols are short-lived and predominantly of the IgG3 subclass. Journal of Infectious Diseases,187(5):862-865.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 32 times in Scopus Article | Citations

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Title Immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses to Plasmodium falciparum glycosylphosphatidylinositols are short-lived and predominantly of the IgG3 subclass
Author Boutlis, Craig S.
Fagan, P. K.
Gowda, D. C.
Lagog, M.
Mgone, C. S.
Bockarie, M. J.
Anstey, Nicholas M.
Journal Name Journal of Infectious Diseases
Publication Date 2003
Volume Number 187
Issue Number 5
ISSN 0022-1899   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-0037333739
Start Page 862
End Page 865
Total Pages 4
Place of Publication Chicago
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Field of Research 1103 - Clinical Sciences
1108 - Medical Microbiology
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract The induction of neutralizing immunity to Plasmodium falciparum toxins by vaccination has been proposed as a preventive strategy to limit the severity of malaria. For this approach to be successful, generation of a sustained immune response would be necessary. This study shows that immunoglobulin G (IgG)-subclass responses elicited by the proposed P. falciparum toxin glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) in Papua New Guinean subjects 5-60 years old predominantly involve IgG3, with a lesser contribution from IgG1 and an absence of IgG2 and IgG4. IgG3 levels declined sharply within 6 weeks of pharmacological clearance of parasitemia in all subjects, whereas a significant decrease in IgG1 levels was seen only in subjects ≤19 years old. Because the natural antibody response to P. falciparum GPIs is skewed toward the short-lived IgG3 subclass, a vaccination strategy with GPI analogues would likely require augmentation by costimulatory molecules, to induce a more persistent anti-GPI response.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/367897   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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