Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Effect of Environmental Temperature on Steady-State and Maximal Cycling

Finn, James Paul, Marsden, J. F., Wood, Robert John and Travar, A. L. (2000). Effect of Environmental Temperature on Steady-State and Maximal Cycling. In: Lau, T, Cotter, J and Forbes-Ewan, C International Conference on Physiological and Cognitive Performance in Extreme Environments, Canberra, 27-30 March 2000.

Document type: Conference Paper
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar

Author Finn, James Paul
Marsden, J. F.
Wood, Robert John
Travar, A. L.
Title Effect of Environmental Temperature on Steady-State and Maximal Cycling
Conference Name International Conference on Physiological and Cognitive Performance in Extreme Environments
Conference Location Canberra
Conference Dates 27-30 March 2000
Conference Publication Title Human Physiology
Editor Lau, T
Cotter, J
Forbes-Ewan, C
Publisher MAIK Nauka - Interperiodica
Publication Year 2000
Volume Number 26
Issue Number 5
ISSN 0362-1197   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 17
End Page 19
Total Pages 3
HERDC Category E1 - Conference Publication (DEST)
Abstract This study found no significant difference in oxygen consumption, heart rate, blood lactate or core temperature of six heat acclimatised athletes during steady-state and maximal cycling when comparing temperate (21.8 ± 0.5 °C; 52 ± 5 % humidity) with warm conditions (29.6 ± 9 % humidity). Steady-state O2 was measured during six consecutive five-minute bouts of cycling, beginning at 75 W (females) and 100 W (males) and increasing by 25 W each period. Peak O2 while cycling was measured on separate occasions using a continuous incremental protocol to exhaustion (female 75 + 25 W.min-1, males 60 + 30 W.min-1). During the peak O2 test the anaerobic threshold was determined from the pulmonary ventilation curves (VE and VE/CO2. Test results observed in temperate conditions were then compared with the results for the same test in warm conditions. The heat acclimatised athletes that took part in this study were able to perform adequately during the stress of relatively short duration exercise in 30 °C heat. As a group, there was no significant difference between temperate and warm conditions for heart rate at the anaerobic threshold. However, as individuals, three of the six subjects in this study had differences of 5, 6 and 9 b.min-1 in heart rate at anaerobic threshold between temperate and warm conditions. This suggests that heart rates used as a marker of the anaerobic threshold for training in the heat be derived from tests in the heat.
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 43 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 12 Sep 2008, 08:35:25 CST by Administrator