Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Enzyme immunoassays in brown snake (Pseudonaja spp.) envenoming: Detecting venom, antivenom and venom-antivenom complexes

O'Leary, Margaret A., Isbister, Geoffrey K., Schneider, Jennifer J., Brown, Simon G. A. and Currie, Bart J. (2006). Enzyme immunoassays in brown snake (Pseudonaja spp.) envenoming: Detecting venom, antivenom and venom-antivenom complexes. Toxicon,48(1):4-11.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts:
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar

IRMA ID s994677xPUB196
Title Enzyme immunoassays in brown snake (Pseudonaja spp.) envenoming: Detecting venom, antivenom and venom-antivenom complexes
Author O'Leary, Margaret A.
Isbister, Geoffrey K.
Schneider, Jennifer J.
Brown, Simon G. A.
Currie, Bart J.
Journal Name Toxicon
Publication Date 2006
Volume Number 48
Issue Number 1
ISSN 0041-0101   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 4
End Page 11
Total Pages 8
Place of Publication UK
Publisher Pergamon
Field of Research 1115 - Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Although a commercial snake venom detection kit (SVDK) is available to distinguish between the five major snake groups in Australia, there is no assay for quantifying venom or antivenom concentrations in envenomed patients. Serum samples were obtained from patients with brown snake (Pseudonaja spp.) envenoming before and after the administration of antivenom and patients with suspected brown snake bites but no evidence of envenoming. Enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) were developed for free venom, free antivenom and the venom-antivenom complex. Standard samples measured in duplicate had a coefficient of variation of less than 10%. The EIA for venom was able to detect brown snake venom down to concentrations of 3ng/mL. A high baseline absorbance was measured in some patients that did not change with the addition of excess antivenom to the samples. In these patients, the baseline absorbance was subtracted from all measurements to calculate the true venom concentration. The EIA for brown snake antivenom had a limit of detection of 20 mu g/mL, but 50 mu g/mL was used as a cut-off based on assays in patients who had not received antivenom. The EIA for venom-antivenom complexes was unable to detect these at the low venom concentrations that occurred in patients. Quantification of venom and antivenom will help to determine the dose of antivenom required to bind venom and to establish appropriate end points for antivenom treatment.
Keywords venom
pseudonaja
ELISA
antivenom
envenoming
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2006.04.001   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 48 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 28 Nov 2007, 14:16:08 CST