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Spatial prioritisation for management of gamba grass (Andropogon gayanus) invasions: accounting for social, economic and environmental values

Adams, Vanessa and Setterfield, Samantha (2012). Spatial prioritisation for management of gamba grass (Andropogon gayanus) invasions: accounting for social, economic and environmental values. In: Eldershaw, Valerie 18th Australasian Weeds Conference 2012, Melbourne, VIC, 8 - 11 October 2012.

Document type: Conference Paper

IRMA ID 82057923xPUB392
Author Adams, Vanessa
Setterfield, Samantha
Title Spatial prioritisation for management of gamba grass (Andropogon gayanus) invasions: accounting for social, economic and environmental values
Conference Name 18th Australasian Weeds Conference 2012
Conference Location Melbourne, VIC
Conference Dates 8 - 11 October 2012
Conference Publication Title 18th Australasian Weeds Conference 2012: Developing Solutions to Evolving Weed Problems
Editor Eldershaw, Valerie
Place of Publication Melbourne, VIC
Publisher Weed Society of Victoria
Publication Year 2012
ISSN 978-0-646-58670-0   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 49
End Page 52
Total Pages 4
HERDC Category E1 - Conference Publication (DIISR)
Abstract Summary
The social, economic and environmental impacts of invasive plants are well recognised. However, the social and economic costs of managing and eradicating invasive plants are rarely accounted for in the spatial prioritisation of funding for weed management.
Gamba grass (Andropogon gayanus Kunth.) is one of five species of tropical invasive grasses that have been listed as a Key Threatening Process (KTP) and it requires urgent strategic management. The aim of this project is to develop a spatially explicit
prioritisation framework to identify optimal budget allocations to both eradication and control measures of gamba grass to minimise the costs (including management costs as well as loss of social, cultural and environmental assets) and likelihood of reinvasion.
Our framework extends recent approaches to systematic prioritisation of weed management to account for spatially variable environmental, social and cultural assets that are threatened by gamba grass including: biodiversity, areas of conservation significance and cultural sites of significance such as aboriginal sacred sites.
Keyword Gamba grass
Systematic spatial prioritisation
Management costs
Description for Link Link to conference proceedings
URL http://www.proceedings.com/20039.html
 
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Created: Fri, 17 Jan 2014, 00:19:36 CST