Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

The role of participatory modeling in landscape approaches to reconcile conservation and development

Sandker, Marieke, Campbell, Bruce M., Ruiz-Perez, Manuel, Sayer, Jeffrey, Cowling, Richard, Habtemariam, Kassa and Knight, Andrew (2010). The role of participatory modeling in landscape approaches to reconcile conservation and development. Ecology and Society,15(2 (Art.13)).

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar

IRMA ID 81704288xPUB371
Title The role of participatory modeling in landscape approaches to reconcile conservation and development
Author Sandker, Marieke
Campbell, Bruce M.
Ruiz-Perez, Manuel
Sayer, Jeffrey
Cowling, Richard
Habtemariam, Kassa
Knight, Andrew
Journal Name Ecology and Society
Publication Date 2010
Volume Number 15
Issue Number 2 (Art.13)
ISSN 1708-3087   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Place of Publication Canada
Publisher Resilience Alliance Publications
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Conservation organizations are increasingly turning to landscape approaches to achieve a balance between conservation and development goals. We use six case studies in Africa and Asia to explore the role of participatory modeling with stakeholders as one of the steps towards implementing a landscape approach. The modeling was enthusiastically embraced by some stakeholders and led to impact in some cases. Different stakeholders valued the modeling exercise differently. Noteworthy was the difference between those stakeholders connected to the policy process and scientists; the presence of the former in the modeling activities is key to achieving policy impacts, and the latter were most critical of participatory modeling. Valued aspects of the modeling included stimulating cross-sector strategic thinking, and helping participants to confront the real drivers of change and to recognize trade-offs. The modeling was generally considered to be successful in building shared understanding of issues. This understanding was gained mainly in the discussions held in the process of building the model rather than in the model outputs. The model itself reflects but a few of the main elements of the usually rich discussions that preceded its finalization. Problems emerged when models became too complex. Key lessons for participatory modeling are the need for good facilitation in order to maintain a balance between “models as stories” and technical modeling, and the importance of inviting the appropriate stakeholders to achieve impact.
Keywords conservation and development
landscape approach
multiple stakeholders
natural resource policy
participatory modeling
systems modeling
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 28 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 17 Jan 2014, 00:34:17 CST