Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Rapid recovery of mammal fauna in the central Kimberley, northern Australia, following the removal of introduced herbivores

Legge, Sarah, Kennedy, Malcolm S., Lloyd, Ray, Murphy, Stephen A. and Fisher, Alaric (2010). Rapid recovery of mammal fauna in the central Kimberley, northern Australia, following the removal of introduced herbivores. Austral Ecology,36(7):791-799.

Document type: Journal Article

IRMA ID 81704288xPUB373
Title Rapid recovery of mammal fauna in the central Kimberley, northern Australia, following the removal of introduced herbivores
Author Legge, Sarah
Kennedy, Malcolm S.
Lloyd, Ray
Murphy, Stephen A.
Fisher, Alaric
Journal Name Austral Ecology
Publication Date 2010
Volume Number 36
Issue Number 7
ISSN 1442-9985   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-79960744019
Start Page 791
End Page 799
Total Pages 9
Place of Publication Melbourne
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Australia has lost more native mammal species than any other country in the past two centuries, and this record of loss looks likely to worsen over the next few decades. Small- to medium-sized mammals are declining in both distribution and density across large tracts of northern Australia's tropical savannas, including within protected areas. The most likely causes are a combination of changed fire patterns, the impacts of introduced herbivores and predation by feral cats. Here, in contrast to the prevailing trend across northern Australia, we report the recovery of native mammals in response to a large-scale (>40 000 ha) destocking experiment carried out at Mornington Wildlife Sanctuary in the central Kimberley, north-west Australia. Following the removal of introduced herbivores from 2004, the species richness and abundance of small native rodents and dasyurids increased significantly across all sampled habitats over the next 3 years. We discuss the implications of these results for guiding land management and applied research to help to reduce the impending risk of mammalian extinctions in northern Australia.
Keywords grazing impact
landscape experiment
mammal decline
northern Australia
tropical savannas
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1442-9993.2010.02218.x   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 38 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 17 Jan 2014, 00:34:23 CST