Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Mass media interventions for preventing smoking in young people (Review)

Brinn, Malcolm P., Carson, Kristin V., Esterman, Adrian J., Chang, Anne B. and Smith, Brian J. (2010). Mass media interventions for preventing smoking in young people (Review). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews,(11 - Article No. CD001006).

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Altmetric Score Altmetric Score is 17
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your CDU eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Download this reading Chang_37446.pdf Published version application/pdf 616.95KB 159
Reading the attached file works best in Firefox, Chrome and IE 9 or later.

IRMA ID 81704288xPUB398
Title Mass media interventions for preventing smoking in young people (Review)
Author Brinn, Malcolm P.
Carson, Kristin V.
Esterman, Adrian J.
Chang, Anne B.
Smith, Brian J.
Journal Name Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Publication Date 2010
Issue Number 11 - Article No. CD001006
ISSN 1469-493X   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Total Pages 59
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
HERDC Category C2 - Journal Article - Other contributions to refereed journal (internal)
Abstract Background
The mass media have been used as a way of delivering preventive health messages. They have the potential to reach and to modify the knowledge, attitudes and behaviour of a large proportion of the community.

Objectives
To evaluate the effectiveness of mass media interventions to prevent smoking in young people in terms of reduced smoking uptake, in addition to secondary outcomes including improved smoking outcomes, attitudes, behaviours, knowledge, self-efficacy and perception.

Search methods
We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialised Register and conducted additional searches of MEDLINE and EMBASE in July 2010.

Selection criteria

Randomized trials, controlled trials without randomization and time series studies that assessed the effectiveness of mass media campaigns (defined as channels of communication such as television, radio, newspapers, bill boards, posters, leaflets or booklets intended to reach large numbers of people and which are not dependent on person to person contact) in influencing the smoking behaviour (either objective or self-reported) of young people under the age of 25 years.

Data collection and analysis
Information relating to the characteristics and the content of media interventions, participants, outcomes, methods of the study and risk of bias was abstracted by two independent reviewers. Studies were combined using qualitative narrative synthesis.

Main results
Seven out of a total of 84 studies reporting information about mass media smoking campaigns met all of the inclusion criteria. All seven studies used a controlled trial design. Three studies concluded that mass media reduced the smoking behaviour of young people. All of the effective campaigns had a solid theoretical basis, used formative research in designing the campaign messages, and message broadcast was of reasonable intensity over extensive periods of time.

Authors' conclusions
There is some evidence that mass media can prevent the uptake of smoking in young people, however the evidence is not strong and contains a number of methodological flaws.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD001006.pub2   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)


© copyright

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in CDU eSpace. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact digitisation@cdu.edu.au.

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 31 Abstract Views, 159 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 17 Jan 2014, 00:35:26 CST