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Is Australia ready for assisted colonization?: Policy changes required to facilitate translocations under climate change

Burbidge, Andrew, Byrne, Margaret, Coates, David, Garnett, Stephen T., Harris, Stephen, Hayward, Matt W., Martin, Tara G., Mcdonald-Madden, Eve, Mitchell, Nicola J., Nally, Simon and Setterfield, Samantha A. (2011). Is Australia ready for assisted colonization?: Policy changes required to facilitate translocations under climate change. Pacific Conservation Biology: a journal dedicated to conservation and wildlife management in the Pacific region,17(3):259-269.

Document type: Journal Article

IRMA ID 82057923xPUB113
Title Is Australia ready for assisted colonization?: Policy changes required to facilitate translocations under climate change
Author Burbidge, Andrew
Byrne, Margaret
Coates, David
Garnett, Stephen T.
Harris, Stephen
Hayward, Matt W.
Martin, Tara G.
Mcdonald-Madden, Eve
Mitchell, Nicola J.
Nally, Simon
Setterfield, Samantha A.
Journal Name Pacific Conservation Biology: a journal dedicated to conservation and wildlife management in the Pacific region
Publication Date 2011
Volume Number 17
Issue Number 3
ISSN 1038-2097   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-83155184873
Start Page 259
End Page 269
Total Pages 11
Place of Publication Australia
Publisher Surrey Beatty & Sons Pty Ltd.
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Assisted Colonization (AC) has been proposed as one method of aiding species to adapt to the impacts of climate change. AC is a form of translocation and translocation protocols for threatened species, mostly for reintroduction, are well established in Australia. We evaluate the information available from implementation of translocations to understand how existing policies and guidelines should be varied to plan, review and regulate AC. While the risks associated with AC are potentially greater than those of reintroductions, AC is likely to be the only available method, other than germplasm storage and establishment of captive populations, of conserving many taxa under future climate change. AC may also be necessary to maintain ecosystem services, particularly where keystone species are affected. Current policies and procedures for the preparation of Translocation Proposals will require modification and expansion to deal with Assisted Colonization, particularly in relation to risk management, genetic management, success criteria, moving associated species and community consultation. Further development of risk assessment processes, particularly for invasiveness, and guidelines for genetic management to maintain evolutionary potential are particularly important in the context of changing climate. Success criteria will need to respond to population establishment in the context of new and evolving ecosystems, and to reflect requirements for any co-establishment of interdependent species. Translocation Proposals should always be subjected to independent peer review before being considered by regulators. We conclude that consistent approaches by regulators and multilateral agreements between jurisdictions are required to minimize duplication, to ensure the risk of AC is adequately assessed and to ensure the potential benefits of AC are realized.
Keywords Assisted Colonization
Assisted migration
Managed relocation
Translocating associated species
Translocation genetic management
Translocation Proposal
Translocation risk assessment
Translocation success criteria
 
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Created: Fri, 17 Jan 2014, 00:46:39 CST